Ajaccio Cathedral

Ajaccio, France

The present Ajaccio cathedral was built between 1577 and 1593 and is attributed to Italian architect Giacomo della Porta. It was built to replace the former Cathedral of Saint-Croix, destroyed in 1553 in order to make room for developments in the city's defenses, as stated in the permit required by the Council of Ancients in 1559 to the Senate of Genoa and Pope Gregory XIII in order to build a new cathedral. The final stone was laid in 1593 by Jules Guistiniani, made bishop by Pope Sixtus V.

According to legend, on August 15, 1769, Letizia Buonaparte felt sudden labor pains while in the cathedral. She rushed home to the Buonaparte's home, just steps away, and gave birth to Napoleon on a first floor sofa before she could reach her bedroom upstairs.

Ajaccio Cathedral is built in the style of the Counter-Reformation with an ocher Baroque façade. The interior's Latin cross is delineated by the shallow and modestly-sized transept, which is covered by a dome. The central nave is very high and wide itself, but is short in length compared to the rest of the building. It is covered with barrel vault arches reminiscent of the Renaissance era. The building also has two aisles that depart from the front door and go up to the transept, separated in the middle by the seven chapels beside two rows of three columns.

The altar is in polychrome marbles, a gift from Elisa Bonaparte, Napoleon's sister, and has an altarpiece composed of four twisted columns of black marble from Porto Venere. The Corinthian orders have a double pedestal with a collection of marble. The tabernacle dates from the time of the construction of the cathedral and originally stood at the baptismal font. It was then placed at the high altar and stands out for its unorthodox style.

Ajaccio Cathedral has seven side chapels. The cathedral also houses a large pipe organ built in 1849 by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll and later restored and electrified by Joël Pétrique.

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Details

Founded: 1577-1593
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carmen Lo (2 years ago)
Beautiful historical church. Stay inside you will feel calm and peace.
Frank Rushworth (2 years ago)
Lovely building inside and outside too, so special inside if that's your Religion or your interest.
Stefan Kasprzyk (2 years ago)
Interesting church. Does not have the "wow" factor of its cousins on the mainland but a few interesting curios. And, of course ( pardon the pun), Napoleon I was here...christened, I think.
Aeronwy (2 years ago)
Very interesting little cathedral. Unassuming on the outside. Inside there is some beautifully intricate stucco decor, but a fair bit of it is chalked on - I wonder why? Budget cuts? Plenty of candles to light inside if you have recently lost a loved one/ are worried about your bowel movements following that dodgy sandwich you are next door. There is also a brilliant organ behind you as you walk in, so don't forget to look up and all around you.
Jeffrey Parrish (2 years ago)
The cathedral was closed when we were there, so that was disappointing. We also were surprised that the cathedral only takes up half of the block - it is rather small for a main draw. The front park and facade are nice, but that is all I experienced. It is hard to think of this smallish church as a main attraction in a city. I am giving them the benefit of the doubt with a 4 star rating.
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