San Giovanni Battista

Corte, France

San Giovanni Battista in Corte consists of a three-nave pre-Romanesque church and a neighboring baptistery, both from the 9th century.

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Address

Saint-Jean 32, Corte, France
See all sites in Corte

Details

Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cyril (12 months ago)
Friendly and welcoming host. Super clean and well equipped room. Quiet place with a beautiful exterior. Little touches that make the difference. Decent breakfast.
Jean-Pierre Crinelli (2 years ago)
Very clean, very welcome, very quiet place, breakfast could be a little better
Pierre Courtin (2 years ago)
Guest house located 5 minutes by car from Corte, the environment is very calm and green! The welcome is perfect with recommendations on restaurants as well as the various visits to be made! The rooms are very spacious and well decorated. Breakfast is fairly supplied with quality products (and salt butter, which is rare in Corsica) We recommend this guest house without hesitation.
christelle scannella (2 years ago)
Charming guest house in a haven of peace and greenery close to Corte. Refined decor with a lot of taste, excellent welcome, attentive and attentive host. Everything is there, 2nd visit and always better! To recommend ?
Jesper Vorstermans (3 years ago)
Fantastis stay in Maison San Giovanni. 5 minutes from Corte in the Hills with a nice big garden. Very nice people and a great room!
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