Ponferrada Castle

Ponferrada, Spain

In 1178, Ferdinand II of León donated the Ponferrada city to the Templar order for protecting the pilgrims on the Way of St. James who passed through El Bierzo in their road to Santiago de Compostela. Their castle was originally a hill-fort and later a Roman citadel. Templar knights took possession of the fortress and reinforced and extended it to use it as an inhabitable palace.

However, the Templars were only able to enjoy the use of their fortress for about twenty years before the order was disbanded and its properties confiscated in 1311. Several noble houses fought over the assets until Alfonso XI allotted them to the Count of Lemos in 1340. Finally the Catholic Monarchs incorporated Ponferrada and its castle into the Crown in 1486. Most of the walls were removed and used in local construction projects.

The building has an irregular square plan and the outstanding features are, above all, the entrance which involves crossing the moat on a drawbridge and, further on, two large towers with crenellations joined by an arch. Its twelve original towers reproduced the shapes of the constellations.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.spain.info

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ma Za (15 months ago)
Great from the outside. If you are a castle lover... Dont go inside :)
Bertalan Péter Farkas (16 months ago)
The castle was in the possession of temple knights during the history, it is the only one remained intact in Spain. It worth to visit. It seems as a Disney castle :)
Scott Koch II (16 months ago)
Been here twice such history here beautiful place.
Federico Fernandez (16 months ago)
Excellent place to inmerse into the Tradition of Spain. Amazing views of Ponferrada. Very well organized self tour. Highly recommended!!!
Helen Wagstaff (2 years ago)
The castle was great (a medieval village within a fortress) but what blew me away was the display of antiquated books from main libraries around the world. (they were excellent replicas of originals but so interesting)
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