Villafranca del Bierzo Castle

Villafranca del Bierzo, Spain

The Villafranca del Bierzo Castle was built in 1515 over the remains of a previous fortification. Its first owner was Don Pedro Alvarez de Toledo (second marques of Villafranca) and since 1850 by Don Joaquin Caro y Alvarez.

More of a fortified-palance than a castle, it was ransacked in 1809 by the English and in 1815 and 1819 by the French during the Independence War.

This building is located in a town of great importance on the pilgrims’ route to Santiago. It has the form of a large square with a rounded turrets at the corners, with the rooms of the palace arranged around a central interior courtyard.

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Details

Founded: 1515
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.everycastle.com

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

nancy bonce (17 months ago)
Imponente castillo con sus grandes torres, en buen estado de conservación, parte de él está habitado por los propietarios, no sé si se puede visitar el interior, sólo los vimos desde el exterior.
Rafael Corzo (18 months ago)
Es una pura ruina
maira rodrigues (18 months ago)
Preservado, lugar agradável e cheio de histórias!
Eva Fernadez González (18 months ago)
Pena q no lo dejen ver x dentro la parte no habitada ... X dos euros entraría mucha gente, sacarían para las mejoras d el... En fin es solo una opinión más.
PITUAVILES Miguel García (19 months ago)
Pintoresco, agradable para dar un paseo por sus calles y tomar algo en la plaza mayor
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