The village of El Barco de Avila is situated in the foothills of the Sierra de Gredos mountain range. After the conquest of Toledo and the retreat of the Muslim lines to the south bank of the river Tajo, King Alfonso VI donated this valley to his daughter and ordered his son-in-law Ramon de Borgoña to erect a fortification and to repopulate the surrounding area.

There is few documented data of the construction of the present castle but due to its architectural design it is dated to the end of the 15th century. The castle, built of granite rubblework, is situated on a small hill on the east bank of the Tormes river. Its groundplan, similar to that of other castles on the Castilian plateau, is a square with circular towers on the corners and sentry boxes in three of its curtain walls. The fourth curtain wall contains the rectangular keep.

The entrance to the keep is on a higher floor level, facing the courtyard. Although totally dismantled you can see traces of two floor levels and columns around a central patio in the walls and floor of the courtyard. Also underground rooms and rain tanks exist beneath the courtyard.

The territory of Valdecorneja is linked to the Alba family since the 14th century when King Enrique II de Trastámara donated it to Don Garci Alvarez de Toledo. It is probably one of the descendants of this first Lord of Valdecorneja who built the present castle.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cris Diaz (17 months ago)
Muy interesante y educativo el taller de interpretación que organiza la oficina de turismo. Absolutamente recomendable
Victoria González (18 months ago)
Es imponente desde fiera, pero por dentro esta vacío. Dos siglos después de ser construido desmontaron el interior. En el vídeo del pueblo que ponen en el museo de la judía te explican un poco más sobre ello.
David Perdomo (18 months ago)
Me encantó.. bueno hace parte de la historia es tranquilo para un rato de silencio.
Angeles Garcia (18 months ago)
Este castillo conserva sus muros exteriores muy bien restaurados. El Interior es diáfano y permite la celebración de eventos, como conciertos. Toda la zona circundante está muy bien cuidada. Se halla en una de las entradas del pueblo, junto al ríen sus torres hay muchas cigüeñas
Mark Pollard (2 years ago)
Just a shell but still nice to visit. Could do a lot more to exhibit it and how the town was at the time of construction, its history etc. A model in the town showed how the castle looked.
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