Castle of Don Álvaro de Luna

Arenas de San Pedro, Spain

The construction of Don Álvaro de Luna castle was commissioned by the High Constable Ruy López Dávalos between the end of the 14th century and the beginning of the 15th century.There is very little left in the interior of the castle. The fires originating from the different wars have left, over time, only the walls of the building. In other periods it was used as a prison and cemetery, and today it is the municipal auditorium.

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Details

Founded: c. 1300
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.spain.info

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Maria Luisa Mayato (9 months ago)
La guía Virginia encantadora, lo explicaba todo muy bien para los niños y los mayores. El castillo está impecable. Tuvimos suerte de aparcar en la puerta pero hay muy poco sitio para los coches.
Diego Roel (9 months ago)
No estaba abierto. Solamente los domingos, parece ser. Impresionante castillo. Alrededores pensados para comer. Parque infantil cerca. Entorno muy bonito y cuidado. Vale la pena acercarse al puente.
JAMF (10 months ago)
Muy recomendable. Lo que pasa que las visitas son solo por la mañana. 10.00/ 12.00/ 14.00 y el precio son 3€ por persona. Los sábados hay una visita por la tarde, 17.00. Arenas de San Pedro es preciso lo peor de allí es el trato de la gente, como no seas de allí te tratan peor.
lorenzo smith (2 years ago)
Geared up as right-wingers and Francoists..sad but true.
Kevin Adamson (3 years ago)
A must visit place. Full of history and artifacts.
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