Alameda Castle

Madrid, Spain

Alameda Castle is one of the scarce remains of military architecture from 15th century and one of few castles that have survived over the time and now arises once more after a restoration process and being converted into a museum.

The origin of the castle dates back to the late fourteenth century or the beginnings of the fifteenth century, and is linked to the Zapata family, who were holders of the seigniory which included the villages of Barajas and La Alameda. Its site has great archaeological value as it is a proven location of human settlements since Prehistoric times.

Refurbished during the sixteenth century, when it was transformed into a Renaissance palace, the fortification is one of the few remains of military architecture of that era preserved in the city.

As has happened with other historical buildings, after falling into disuse in the eighteenth century, the castle was used as a source of building materials for the population in the area, which contributed to its great deterioration, particularly noticeable during the nineteenth century. Years later, the enclave resumed its military function, being used as a small stronghold in the Spanish Civil War, when a rifle cache was also built in the area.

The Castle of Barajas ensemble is structured around two premises that include the main body of the building and the space surrounding the barbican. Of a rectangular design and rounded corners, the castle surface barely exceeds 200 square meters. The walls are made of limestone masonry and include the remains of two towers. One of them, the keep tower, has a quadrangular design and lies on the northeastern angle of the castle, while the second one, of a cylindrical layout, lies on the southeastern side. Inside, the castle structure was designed around a courtyard with ancillary rooms, complemented by the said keep tower.

The barbican remains may be found some four meters away around the castle, but only sections of wall fillings half a meter high have been preserved. The ensemble was completed with a moat surrounding the small stronghold; however, only the eastern and western flanks have reached our times.

Next to the castle itself and the prehistoric remains, the historic ensemble is completed by the Guard House, a rifle cache from the Civil War and the pantheon that the Fernán Núñez family built around 1898 and which is still in use.

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Founded: 1431
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Racso Iarol (3 years ago)
If you are around take a look, get some quick history in. If you are not near....don't.
Gustavo Millás (3 years ago)
Beautiful. If you have the opportunity, it completely worths a visit, that's always a good place to go if you want to get in touch with the local culture, just because you're gonna see lots of people and different things.
Ion Etxarte (3 years ago)
Nice little ruins of the castle. Open on weekends and holidays. The staff was very helpful.
Karinna Gulias (3 years ago)
Historical place. Needs some work to make surroundings prettier and more appealing to tourists, like a garden etc.
Madalina Florea (4 years ago)
Great place to visit!
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