Oratorio del Caballero de Gracia

Madrid, Spain

Oratorio del Caballero de Gracia is one of the best hidden architectural treasures in Madrid. This church looks small from the outside, but inside it unfolds into a neoclassical temple by Juan de Villanueva, which looks like a Roman basilica.

Among its most noteworthy internal features are the single-piece granite columns, the vault and the sculptures of the Virgen del Socorro, signed by Francisco Elías in 1825, and of Cristo de la Agonía, which, according to studies, was made by Juan Sánchez Barba in 1650. The church belongs to the Caballero de Gracia Eucharistic Association, founded by Jacobo Gratiis (known as the Caballero de Gracia), who was born in Modena in 1517 and who died in Madrid in 1619. It is currently run by Opus Dei.

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Founded: 1786-1795
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ellis Gil Luciano (9 months ago)
Confessions are available regularly.
Andres Gonzalez (15 months ago)
Please as you can read Hebrews chapter 10 and ponder deeply in why you are still offers every day the same sacrifice ? I love you all, it is not for contender I too was in the same error, but by The Grace of GOD JESUS I am what I am now, häleluYÁH, read your Bible and your eyes will be open exodus 20 and Deuteronomy chapter 5
professional Marengi (2 years ago)
First and mainly, I am a practicing Catholic and its services say something significant to me. But, it is as well part of Madrid's historival patrimony.. Worthy of visiting.
Pilarmo Tara (2 years ago)
It is a very prayerful church and a good place to go to confession there as priests are available. Moreover the remains of Blessed Guadalupe Ortiz de Landazuri are there. She was a chemestry lecturer and a member of Opus Dei.
Pedro Haddock (2 years ago)
Excellent. Beata Guadalupe Ortiz remains are kept at the oratory.
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