Odeon of Herodes Atticus

Athens, Greece

The Odeon of Herodes Atticus is a stone theatre structure located on the southwest slope of the Acropolis of Athens. It was built in 161 AD by the Athenian magnate Herodes Atticus in memory of his wife, Aspasia Annia Regilla. It was originally a steep-sloped theater with a three-story stone front wall and a wooden roof made of expensive cedar of Lebanon timber. It was used as a venue for music concerts with a capacity of 5,000. It lasted intact until it was destroyed and left in ruins by the Heruli in 267 AD.

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Acropolis, Athens, Greece
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Founded: 161 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Greece

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

John Ashworth (2 years ago)
If you have an Acropolis card this is part of the package and you get excellent views from the top of the Acropolis. You can also view the front of the Odeon from the lower slopes of the Acropolis but you dont seem to be able to actually enter the Odeon unless you go to one of the performances held there in the summer.
Dave T (2 years ago)
The more intact and larger roman era amphitheatre in the grounds of the acropolis. Stunning and still used for the very occasional performance. Genuinly one of the best places in a city with many spectacular sites 2500 years old and still used for its original pupose, Wow
Dominik Kuthan (2 years ago)
Very cool place on the slopes of Akropolis. Amazing architecture and design make you feel the ancient atmosphere of this place. It is just under the main spot of this location, the famed Parthenon making it easy to access and hard to miss. There are some details about it's structure and history, so don't skip them either.
H James (2 years ago)
A cool place to explore at the foot of the Acropolis, with amazing architecture to admire at. It's also a neat place for photo operations. Imagine someone standing under the recessed stone 'cave' with the bold arch above, and the sun shining at a slant angle thus casting revealing shadows on the object. In such a condition, any pose would yield a wonderful photo there. However, be aware of some young ladies wandering around offering 'free' roses to those off guard tourists, like me. Trust me those roses are not free.
Yogesh Gandhi (2 years ago)
The central stage is lined up by parallel curved lines running upwards that form the seating area. If this area looks spectacular today, one can only imagine how it must have looked when it was in its prime. The honey yellow stone glows magnificently under evening lights drawing out nothing but the best from the performers, leaving the audience enchanted for the performance as well as the setting. A theatre unlike others!
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