Odeon of Herodes Atticus

Athens, Greece

The Odeon of Herodes Atticus is a stone theatre structure located on the southwest slope of the Acropolis of Athens. It was built in 161 AD by the Athenian magnate Herodes Atticus in memory of his wife, Aspasia Annia Regilla. It was originally a steep-sloped theater with a three-story stone front wall and a wooden roof made of expensive cedar of Lebanon timber. It was used as a venue for music concerts with a capacity of 5,000. It lasted intact until it was destroyed and left in ruins by the Heruli in 267 AD.

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Acropolis, Athens, Greece
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Details

Founded: 161 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Greece

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kristin Kachmar (6 months ago)
We watched a musical performance with 4 singers and a girls choir. Not a bad seat in the house and so much fun to sit in an ancient historical site. I recommend any performance!!!
Elaine Carr (6 months ago)
Went here for a concert as part of the Athens Festival, what a fantastic experience. The music was amazing. The theatre is so atmospheric - the moon was shining through the ancient arches. The acoustics and lighting added to the experience. If you are in Athens during the Festival this is an absolute must. We paid for the best seats so not cheap but still no where near what you would pay for a show in London. You can book tickets easily online at the Festival website.
Natasja Juno (6 months ago)
I'm filled with awe whenever I sit on those 2,5 thousand year old marbled steps and watch an art performance. It's breathtaking. It's easily accessible on foot from the Acropolis metro station.
Rui Santo (6 months ago)
The theater from above seems magnificent. However, if you manage to seat inside, for a example for a show, you will see that the experience is beyond magnificent. Definitely recommend assisting something on the side of the theater, so that you can have a view to the stage and the acropolis.
PHI PHAN (6 months ago)
Saw Max Cooper here, the ancient theatre is out of this world for it's acoustic and design. Of course the artist and his team brought the music but the venue itself played a huge part in the success of the show. Can't wait to come back for another show!
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Lorca Castle

Castle of Lorca (Castillo de Lorca) is a fortress of medieval origin constructed between the 9th and 15th centuries. It consists of a series of defensive structures that, during the Middle Ages, made the town and the fortress an impregnable point in the southeast part of the Iberian Peninsula. Lorca Castle was a key strategic point of contention between Christians and Muslims during the Reconquista.

Archaeological excavations have revealed that the site of the castle has been inhabited since Neolithic times.

Muslim Era

It has not been determined exactly when a castle or fortress was first built on the hill. The first written documentation referring to a castle at Lorca is of Muslim origin, which in the 9th century, indicates that the city of Lurqa was an important town in the area ruled by Theudimer (Tudmir). During Muslim rule, Lorca Castle was an impregnable fortress and its interior was divided into two sections by the Espaldón Wall. In the western part, there was an area used to protect livestock and grain in times of danger. The eastern part had a neighbourhood called the barrio de Alcalá.

After Reconquista

Lorca was conquered by the Castilian Infante Don Alfonso, the future Alfonso X, in 1244, and the fortress became a key defensive point against the Kingdom of Granada. For 250 years, Lorca Castle was a watchpoint on the border between the Christian kingdom of Murcia and the Muslim state of Granada.

Alfonso X ordered the construction of the towers known as the Alfonsina and Espolón Towers, and strengthened and fixed the walls. Hardly a trace of the Muslim fortress remained due to this reconstruction. Muslim traces remain in the foundation stones and the wall known as the muro del Espaldón.

The Jewish Quarter was found within the alcazaba, the Moorish fortification, separated from the rest of the city by its walls. The physical separation had the purpose of protecting the Jewish people in the town from harm, but also had the result of keeping Christians and Jews separate, with the Christians inhabiting the lower part of town.

The remains of the Jewish Quarter extended over an area of 5,700 square m, and 12 homes and a synagogue have been found; the synagogue dates from the 14th century and is the only one found in the Murcia. The streets of the town had an irregular layout, adapted to the landscape, and is divided into four terraces. The synagogue was in the central location, and around it were the homes. The homes were of rectangular shape, with various compartmentalized rooms. The living quarters were elevated and a common feature was benches attached to the walls, kitchens, stand for earthenware jars, or cupboards.

Modern history

With the disappearance of the frontier after the conquest of Granada in 1492, Lorca Castle no longer became as important as before. With the expulsion of the Jews by order of Ferdinand and Isabella, Lorca Castle was also depopulated as a result. The castle was abandoned completely, and was almost a complete ruin by the 18th century. In the 19th century, the castle was refurbished due to the War of Spanish Independence. The walls and structures were repaired or modified and its medieval look changed. A battery of cannons was installed, for example, during this time. In 1931 Lorca Castle was declared a National Historic Monument.

Currently, a parador (luxury hotel) has been built within the castle. As a result, archaeological discoveries have been found, including the Jewish Quarter.