Arch of Hadrian

Athens, Greece

The Arch of Hadrian is a monumental gateway resembling – in some respects – a Roman triumphal arch. It spanned an ancient road from the center of Athens, to the complex of structures on the eastern side of the city that included the Temple of Olympian Zeus. It has been proposed that the arch was built to celebrate the adventus (arrival) of the Roman Emperor Hadrian and to honor him for his many benefactions to the city, on the occasion of the dedication of the nearby temple complex in 131 or 132 AD.

It is not certain who commissioned the arch, although it is probable that the citizens of Athens or another Greek group were responsible for its construction and design. There were two inscriptions on the arch, facing in opposite directions, naming both Theseus and Hadrian as founders of Athens. While it is clear that the inscriptions honor Hadrian, it is uncertain whether they refer to the city as a whole or to the city in two parts: one old and one new. The early idea, however, that the arch marked the line of the ancient city wall, and thus the division between the old and the new regions of the city, has been shown to be false by further excavation.

 

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Details

Founded: 131-132 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Greece

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

pts pts (9 months ago)
Top location. See the temple of Olympian Zues and the old walls easily here. Very close to Acropolis and lots of food available. Wish more of the arch and temple were restored!
Chad Rast (9 months ago)
Pretty effective as a landmark and meeting spot, but not much else these days.
Kevin Septian (10 months ago)
It is one of the main meeting point. It is always crowded and mant people are waiting the others. So many shops around it and it offers an amazing view to the sea and also to the hill at the back. It is of course also part of the important history.
Santiago (10 months ago)
Unluckily quite deteriorated, it is one more witness of greater times of the city. It is located just outside the Temple of Zeus and has free access. You will pass it either on your way to the Temple or see it when walking the streets of Plaka.
F R Khan (12 months ago)
A historical site, just near to the centre. It is quite amazing that, it's almost 3000 years old, and.. still................ It's standing. Sometimes, these monuments make me believe... There might be aliens, helping human....... Or they were more advanced then us..
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