Philopappos Monument

Athens, Greece

The Philopappos Monument is an ancient Greek mausoleum and monument dedicated to Gaius Julius Antiochus Epiphanes Philopappos or Philopappus, (65–116 AD), a prince from the Kingdom of Commagene. It is located on Mouseion Hill in Athens, southwest of the Acropolis.

The monument was built on the same site where Musaios or Musaeus, a 6th-century BC priestly poet and mystical seer, was held to have been buried. The location of this tomb, opposite the Acropolis and within formal boundaries of the city, shows the high position Philopappos had within Athenian society

Philopappos’ monument is a two-storey structure, supported by a base. On the lower level there is a frieze representing Philopappos as a consul, riding on a chariot and led by lictors. The upper level shows statues of three men: of Antiochus IV on the left, of Philopappos in the centre and of Seleucus I Nicator, now lost, on the right.

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Address

Mouson 19, Athens, Greece
See all sites in Athens

Details

Founded: c. 116 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Greece

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ioana Chiorean (2 years ago)
Probably the best Acropolis view. Definitely a must while visiting Athens Surrounded by a nice park, getting up is a beautiful and accessible hike. Check the 360° views of all Athens.
Cristian C (2 years ago)
The view you get from this place is amazing! Perfect place for sunsets.
Andreea Cristina Hurmuz (2 years ago)
Very nice panoramic views but hard to reach.
Adam Wood (2 years ago)
Not much at the top of the hill beyond the monument, which is pretty decent for what it is. The view, however, is worth the walk through the hot sunshine. The hill provides spectacular views across to the Acropolis of Athens and out over the city and off to the ocean too. The walk to the monument was far less strenuous than we predicted.
Dimitrias Plaskassovitis (2 years ago)
A beautifully peaceful place for locals to enjoy their history and natural beauty. A perfect spot to enjoy the sunset over Athens and see the Parthenon in its glory. I hope it stays clean , peaceful, and free for all.
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