Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens

Athens, Greece

The Metropolitan Cathedral of the Annunciation construction began on Christmas Day, 1842 with the laying of the cornerstone by King Otto and Queen Amalia.

Workers used marble from 72 demolished churches to build the Cathedral's immense walls. Three architects and 20 years later, it was complete. On May 21, 1862, the completed Cathedral was dedicated to the Annunciation of the Mother of God by the King and Queen. The Cathedral is a three-aisled, domed basilica. Inside are the tombs of two saints killed by the Ottoman Turks during the Ottoman period: Saint Philothei and Patriarch Gregory V.

Saint Philothei built a convent, was martyred in 1589, and her bones are still visible in a silver reliquary. She is honored for ransoming Greek women enslaved in Ottoman Empire's harems.Gregory V the Ethnomartyr, Patriarch of Constantinople, was hanged by order of Sultan Mahmud II and his body thrown into the Bosphorus in 1821, in retaliation for the Greek uprising on March 25, leading to the Greek War of Independence. His body was rescued by Greek sailors and eventually enshrined in Athens.

In the Square in front of the Cathedral stand two statues. The first is that of Saint Constantine XI the Ethnomartyr, the last Byzantine Emperor. The second is a statue of Archbishop Damaskinos who was Archbishop of Athens during World War II and was Regent for King George II and Prime Minister of Greece in 1946.

The Metropolitan Cathedral remains a major landmark in Athens and the site of important ceremonies with national political figures present, as well as weddings and funerals of notable personalities.

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Details

Founded: 1842
Category: Religious sites in Greece

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

symeon pearl (15 months ago)
The cathedral started to build in the 19o century. 1830 they have two holly relics as a treasure. Saint philothei the Athenian, and Saint Gregory the fifth patriarch of Constantinople.
Casey C. (16 months ago)
Average European church. Nothing sticks out about it to make it any different.
Leslie Sharp (16 months ago)
Such amazing artifacts..history...stories
Girl Forever (16 months ago)
A building with a very beautiful architecture and a place of worship for orthodox christians. Spirituality.
sumit saurabh (17 months ago)
Nice place ! Walking in the evening is the best thing you can do ! Many restaurants and local Souvenir shops around the place ! The place has a speacial place in the heart of local Greek people !
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