The original Roman Agora was encroached upon and obstructed by a series of Roman buildings, beginning with the imperial family's gift to the Athenians of a large odeion (concert hall). The Odeon of Agrippa was built by him in around 15 BC, and measured 51.4 by 43.2 metres, rose several stories in height, and – being sited just north of the Middle Stoa – obstructed the old agora. In return for the odeion, the Athenians built a statue to Agrippa at the site of the previous agora; they based it on a plinth recycled from an earlier statue by covering the old inscription with a new one.

After the invasion of the Herulae in AD 267 the city of Athens was restricted to the area within the Late Roman fortification wall, and the administrative and commercial centre of the city was transferred from the Ancient Agora to the Roman Agora and the Library of Hadrian. 

During the Byzantine period and the Turkish occupation the area was covered with houses, workshops and churches along with the Fethiye Mosque. 

Buildings and structures

The Tower of the Winds is an octagonal Pentelic marble clocktower that functioned as a horologion or 'timepiece'. It is considered the world's first meteorological station. The structure features a combination of sundials, a water clock, and a wind vane. It was supposedly built by Andronicus of Cyrrhus around 50 BC, but according to other sources, might have been constructed in the 2nd century BC before the rest of the forum.

The Gate of Athena Archegetis is considered to be the second most prominent remain in the site after the Tower of the Winds. Constructed in 11 BCE by donations from Julius Caesar and Augustus, the gate was made of 4 Doric columns and a base of Pentelic marble. It was a monument dedicated by the Athenians to their patroness Athena Archegetis.

The East Propylon is the eastern entrance of the Roman Agora in Athens. Built in 19-11 BCE, it constituted of 4 Ionic columns made of gray Hymettian marble.

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Address

Polignotou 3, Athens, Greece
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Details

Founded: 19-11 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Greece

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

pts pts (18 days ago)
Very good place to visit. Make sure you look at the plaques showing it's original construction before looking around. It will help you visualize the forum. Tower of winds and arch were highlights
Eyal Netanely (22 days ago)
It's quite nice, didn't enjoy too much. Maybe because I have seen more interesting locations in the past. Beware of the people who try to sell you these handwoven bracelets and tell you it's for free, it's not. They will rip you off..
Lene Wilhelmsen (24 days ago)
Loved it! Especially the latrines and the tower of the winds are amazing. The function of the tower could be explained better. Part of the 30€ combo ticket.
Santiago (26 days ago)
Interesting site included in the combined ticket for the Acropolis, in particular due to the well conserved Tower of the Winds. If you are in a hurry you can appreciate most of the ruins from outside, but if you want to take a close look at the tower, including the aspect inside use the above mentioned ticket.
julian lastowski (2 months ago)
The size of the ruins is impressive. But, as many reviewers have pointed out one can appreciate it from a quick walk by. Athens is filled with ruins much more impressive. So if short on time, this is not a bucket list item.
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