Panathenaic Stadium

Athens, Greece

The Panathenaic Stadium or Kallimarmaro is a multi-purpose stadium in Athens. One of the main historic attractions of Athens, it is the only stadium in the world built entirely of marble.

A stadium was built on the site of a simple racecourse by the Athenian statesman Lykourgos c. 330 BC, primarily for the Panathenaic Games. It was rebuilt in marble by Herodes Atticus, an Athenian Roman senator, by 144 AD and had a capacity of 50,000 seats. After the rise of Christianity in the 4th century it was largely abandoned.

The stadium was excavated in 1869 and hosted the Zappas Olympics in 1870 and 1875. After being refurbished, it hosted the opening and closing ceremonies of the first modern Olympics in 1896 and was the venue for 4 of the 9 contested sports. It was used for various purposes in the 20th century and was once again used as an Olympic venue in 2004. It is the finishing point for the annual Athens Classic Marathon. It is also the last venue in Greece from where the Olympic flame handover ceremony to the host nation takes place.

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Agras 22, Athens, Greece
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Founded: 144 AD
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Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Temitope Otubusin (2 years ago)
It was lovely to visit the home of the first of the modern Olympic games. There's really nothing much to see except to feel the emotions felt by those in the games years ago. It's a beautiful picture spot too.
steven xavier solipse (2 years ago)
The geometry of this space is pleasing to the eye. The tree-filled upper park spaces which flank it on both sides are the real attraction here, especially in summer when the sun is in full force. Also an excellent spot to jog in the morning and the evening, if you are local.
Christos Kazantzoglou (2 years ago)
I love the Olympics so getting a chance to visit the first Olympic stadium was amazing for me. It's 5 euro in although if you really want to get in for free it's not too hard. If you pay you also get an audio guide which is good. Ignoring the history it's actually a really beautiful stadium made entirely of marble. The best parts is getting to get on the track and the medal rostrum! If you in anyway care about the Olympics this is a must visit.
Robert Cooke (2 years ago)
I love the Olympics so getting a chance to visit the first Olympic stadium was amazing for me. It's 5 euro in although if you really want to get in for free it's not too hard. If you pay you also get an audio guide which is good. Ignoring the history it's actually a really beautiful stadium made entirely of marble. The best parts is getting to get on the track and the medal rostrum! If you in anyway care about the Olympics this is a must visit.
Madchill (2 years ago)
Athens are not particularly a pretty city, you know, you just expect a little bit more as a tourist. But then you go to the Olympic Stadium, have a run with your friends (just so you can feel like a real Olympic champion), and you sit on the highest bench and look at the Acropolis. If you are at the right time and are lucky enough to have a sunny weather, you can see the beauty that ancient Greeks were seeing in this place and understand why it was worshipped. Make sure that you take your time and allow all this beauty to sink in. I guarantee you will feel like looking at the real life postcard. Such a beautiful experience.
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