Tzistarakis Mosque

Athens, Greece

Tzistarakis Mosque was built in 1759, by the Ottoman governor of Athens, Mustapha Agha Tzistarakis. According to tradition, Tzistarakis used one of the pillars of the Temple of Olympian Zeus to make lime for the building, although it is more likely that he used one of the columns of the nearby Hadrian's Library. This act led to his dismissal as the Turks considered it a sacrilege which would cause vengeful spirits to be loosened upon the city, a superstition that some Athenians believed to have been confirmed when there was an outbreak of the plague later in the year.

During the Greek War of Independence, the building was used as an assembly hall for the local town elders. After Greek independence, it was used in various ways: thus it was the site of a ball in honour of King Otto of Greece in March 1834, and was also employed as a barracks, a prison and a storehouse.

In 1915, it was partly rebuilt under the supervision of architect Anastasios Orlandos, and was used to house the Museum of Greek Handwork from 1918 until 1973. In 1966, it was provisionally refurbished to provide a place of prayer during the stay of the deposed King of Saudi Arabia, Saud, in the city.

In 1973, the main functions of the Museum of Greek Folk Art moved but the V. Kyriazopoulos pottery collection of ceramics remains in the mosque to this day.

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Details

Founded: 1759
Category: Religious sites in Greece

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nick Him (3 years ago)
A nice place in the Monastiraki square to take some good photos. Easy to access from the square. Many attractions also around.
Babouri Salim (4 years ago)
Heritage
Poj Ta. (4 years ago)
Days to visit the market. The building is obscured, so it does not look very interesting.
Alaiye Kekova (4 years ago)
How dissapointing.Greeks should Respect Muslims And all Skins and Religions!If Greece was a Non Racist Country they would have never closed it.
YASIR HAMDAN (4 years ago)
No
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