Sainte-Enimie is a former commune founded in the 7th century by Énimie (according a legend a daughter of the Merovingian king Clothar II), who started a convent there after being cured of leprosy in the surrounding waters. It was the site of several monasteries, some of which still remain. Located in the Gorges du Tarn, it is a member of Les Plus Beaux Villages de France (“the most beautiful villages of France”) association.

Two monasteries, one male and one female, were built in the area but destroyed by invasions. Stephen, Bishop of Mende, requested that a Benedictine monastery be built there, and it was completed in 951. It became a popular pilgrimage destination due to the miraculous story surrounding its founding.

During the French Revolution in 1798, the monastery was destroyed and the town renamed 'Puy Roc'; however, this lasted only a short time.

In 1905, a road was built along the Tarn, giving the village greater commercial exposure. Starting in the 1950s, tourism became a major part of Sainte-Enimie's economy.

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Details

Founded: 7th century AD
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Frederick Revell (2 years ago)
Beautiful & cool on a hot September fay
gilbert mason (2 years ago)
Fabulous ! Don't forget to visit the Millau bridge....
Phil Gibbs (2 years ago)
Just driving thru is magical, beautiful and peaceful. Must return and spend time there.
Phil Gibbs (2 years ago)
Just driving thru is magical, beautiful and peaceful. Must return and spend time there.
Fnd Slamet (2 years ago)
We entered this place by coincidentally.. not really our destination.. but this is certainly great place to be passed
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