Sainte-Enimie is a former commune founded in the 7th century by Énimie (according a legend a daughter of the Merovingian king Clothar II), who started a convent there after being cured of leprosy in the surrounding waters. It was the site of several monasteries, some of which still remain. Located in the Gorges du Tarn, it is a member of Les Plus Beaux Villages de France (“the most beautiful villages of France”) association.

Two monasteries, one male and one female, were built in the area but destroyed by invasions. Stephen, Bishop of Mende, requested that a Benedictine monastery be built there, and it was completed in 951. It became a popular pilgrimage destination due to the miraculous story surrounding its founding.

During the French Revolution in 1798, the monastery was destroyed and the town renamed 'Puy Roc'; however, this lasted only a short time.

In 1905, a road was built along the Tarn, giving the village greater commercial exposure. Starting in the 1950s, tourism became a major part of Sainte-Enimie's economy.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 7th century AD
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Phil Gibbs (2 years ago)
Just driving thru is magical, beautiful and peaceful. Must return and spend time there.
Fnd Slamet (2 years ago)
We entered this place by coincidentally.. not really our destination.. but this is certainly great place to be passed
Yo Pen (3 years ago)
Vignes on Gorges du Tarn Small village on the edge of the Tarn, with amazing scenery and lovely welcoming people. There's kayaking to do and a great shop for local cold meat, cheese and wine which will not disappoint you.
D Green (3 years ago)
Fantastic place. Climbing zones are easy to reach, rock texture is awesome.
MoTo JoJo (3 years ago)
Biking heaven! Some fast flowing sections which turn into tight twisty parts. Beware awesome views most of the way (and locals cutting blind corners, especially the kayak transporters). If you're not on a motorbike then plenty of places to stop and marvel at the views, plus kayaking etc
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Augustusburg Palace

Augustusburg Palace represents one of the first examples of Rococo creations in Germany. For the Cologne elector and archbishop Clemens August of the House of Wittelsbach it was the favourite residence. In 1725 the Westphalian architect Johann Conrad Schlaun was commissioned by Clemens August to begin the construction of the palace on the ruins of a medieval moated castle.

In 1728, the Bavarian court architect François de Cuvilliés took over and made the palace into one of the most glorious residences of its time. Until its completion in 1768, numerous outstanding artists of European renown contributed to its beauty. A prime example of the calibre of artists employed here is Balthasar Neumann, who created the design for the magnificent staircase, an enchanting creation full of dynamism and elegance. The magical interplay of architecture, sculpture, painting and garden design made the Brühl Palaces a masterpiece of German Rococo.

UNESCO honoured history and present of the Rococo Palaces by inscribing Augustusburg Palace – together with Falkenlust Palace and their extensive gardens – on the World Heritage List in 1984. From 1949 onwards, Augustusburg Palace was used for representative purposes by the German Federal President and the Federal Government for many decades.

In 1728, Dominique Girard designed the palace gardens according to French models. Owing to constant renovation and care, it is today one of the most authentic examples of 18th century garden design in Europe. Next to the Baroque gardens, Peter Joseph Lenné redesigned the forested areas based on English landscaping models. Today it is a wonderful place to have a walk.