Sainte-Enimie is a former commune founded in the 7th century by Énimie (according a legend a daughter of the Merovingian king Clothar II), who started a convent there after being cured of leprosy in the surrounding waters. It was the site of several monasteries, some of which still remain. Located in the Gorges du Tarn, it is a member of Les Plus Beaux Villages de France (“the most beautiful villages of France”) association.

Two monasteries, one male and one female, were built in the area but destroyed by invasions. Stephen, Bishop of Mende, requested that a Benedictine monastery be built there, and it was completed in 951. It became a popular pilgrimage destination due to the miraculous story surrounding its founding.

During the French Revolution in 1798, the monastery was destroyed and the town renamed 'Puy Roc'; however, this lasted only a short time.

In 1905, a road was built along the Tarn, giving the village greater commercial exposure. Starting in the 1950s, tourism became a major part of Sainte-Enimie's economy.

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Details

Founded: 7th century AD
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Phil Gibbs (4 months ago)
Just driving thru is magical, beautiful and peaceful. Must return and spend time there.
Fnd Slamet (7 months ago)
We entered this place by coincidentally.. not really our destination.. but this is certainly great place to be passed
Yo Pen (14 months ago)
Vignes on Gorges du Tarn Small village on the edge of the Tarn, with amazing scenery and lovely welcoming people. There's kayaking to do and a great shop for local cold meat, cheese and wine which will not disappoint you.
D Green (14 months ago)
Fantastic place. Climbing zones are easy to reach, rock texture is awesome.
MoTo JoJo (19 months ago)
Biking heaven! Some fast flowing sections which turn into tight twisty parts. Beware awesome views most of the way (and locals cutting blind corners, especially the kayak transporters). If you're not on a motorbike then plenty of places to stop and marvel at the views, plus kayaking etc
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