Château de Castelbouc

Sainte-Enimie, France

Château de Castelbouc lies in the small village of Castelbouc on an beautiful rock spur. The castle was first mentioned in the 12th century, when it was owned by Etienne de Castelbouc. In 1592 the castle was razed during the Wars of Religion.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jan Jannos (19 months ago)
Viewpoint Panorama gegenüber am Parkplatz: Prades
Michel SERAYET (2 years ago)
Superbe site dans les gorges du Tarn. Le petit village de Castelbouc est très vite parcouru , mais ses maisons contre la falaise et ses petites ruelles en font un site pittoresque qui mérite le détour
Yehiel Akwa (2 years ago)
נוף מהמם, הבתים צמודים בסמוך לצוק מעל נהר הטארן
Pascal Massimino (3 years ago)
The castle is inaccessible (the only way up is on a private property), but you can go on the rocky formation in the back (15mins uphill) following the 'rue du chateau'. You'll get a nice view on the ruins and the Tarn in the background.
Julien C. (4 years ago)
one of the most peaceful and beautiful places in France !
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