The Kajaani Castle was built on the Ämmäkoski island of the Kajaani river in the 17th century. The castle functioned as a administrative centre, a prison, and a military strongpoint. The most famous prisoner in the castle was the historian Johannes Messenius, who was forced to live in the poor conditions of the castle from 1616 to 1635.

Construction of the Kajaani castle began in 1604 and was completed in 1619. At first the castle only consisted of a stone wall, two round towers, and wooden buildings at the yard inside the castle.

Count Peter Brahe ordered a second construction stage of the castle, which was started in the 1650s and completed in 1666. During this construction stage, many wooden structures of the castle were replaced with stone structures to form a fortress.

During the Great Northern War (also known as the "Greater Wrath"), Russian forces sieged the castle for several months, until it was finally forced to surrender because of lack of food, firewood and ammunition. Shortly after this, the Russians exploded the castle and its inhabitants were transported to Russia to be imprisoned.

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Address

Ahontie, Kajaani, Finland
See all sites in Kajaani

Details

Founded: 1604-1619
Category: Ruins in Finland
Historical period: Reformation (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hazi dear (13 months ago)
Nice place to visit
Juhana Nieminen (16 months ago)
Interesting piece of Finnish history.
Jani Havulehto (16 months ago)
Nice ruins, worth visiting. No entry fee
Radu Paul (17 months ago)
A place steeped in history. Emotions are high!!!
- Majeros (19 months ago)
Very interesting place in the city. I believe it was important building in its time in past.
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