Puente del Congosto Castle

Puente del Congosto, Spain

The origins of Puente del Congosto Castle dates from the 12th and 13th centuries. It was built for defensive reasons, to control the route which connected Ciudad Rodrigo with Avila.

In 1393, Enrique III granted the manor of the Puente del Congosto to Gil Gonzalez Davila, which rebuilt the castle, which would be Posada Real. The Duke of Alba bought the castle to the Emperor Carlos in 1539, adding to the rectangular tower the large cube gives to the building most uniqueness.

The castle is in a good state of conservation. It is made up of an outer enclosure and an inner fortification formed by a great rectangular keep with a second tower build against it.

The outer enclosure is an irregular rubblework hexagon, reinforced in the corners by granite ashlars. Because it is more vulnerable than the others, the western curtain wall of the outer enclosure is extra protected with a small tower in its center. The gate is situated in the northern wall and is protected by another wall. There is also a postern in the eastern wall on a higher floor level.The keep is made up of two great halls with brick vaults sustained by arcs of ashlar masonry. In the lower hall, on a height of about 3 meters in the western wall, is the entrance to the spiral staircase that leads to the upper hall. In the eastern wall is a little window. The top of the keep was originally crenelated.The ground floor level of the second tower is only the one that can be accessed from the courtyard. All the higher floor level in this tower can only be accessed through wall staircase from the keep.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jose Luis Martin (17 months ago)
Monumento de la Historia de Salamanca, muy bien conservado..... Magnífico
Rafael Puñales (17 months ago)
Me encanta este lugar porque elegí el momento preciso y la compañía adecuada para visitarlo. Con la primavera avanzada, el olor de la hierba verde en el aire, el rugido templado de la corriente de agua entre las rocas, y la belleza en la mirada de la mujer de mis sueños, ... también hay un castillo medieval, pequeño.
Fernando Rubio Ahumada (17 months ago)
Precioso lugar histórico. Tiene una gran playa y un sendero para caminar y disfrutar. Un puente y un castillo hermosos. Muy recomendable si estás visitanto la Sierra de Gredos
Jose Luis Romero (19 months ago)
No se visita, pero el lugar bien vale para detenerse y parar un rato y relajarse en un pueblito con encanto, una joya donde no se espera encontrar nada.
Kio Somniara (2 years ago)
Por fuera el castillo es bastante bonito. Hace del pueblo un lugar pintoresco. Es una pena no haber podido entrar.
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