New Cathedral of Salamanca

Salamanca, Spain

The New Cathedral is located adjacent to the Old Cathedral in Salamanca. It was constructed between the 16th and 18th centuries in two styles: late Gothic and Baroque. Building began in 1513 and the cathedral was consecrated in 1733.

The building began at a time when the gothic style was becoming less popular and was merging with the new Renaissance style, giving the resulting Plateresque style in Spain. However, this cathedral retained more of its Gothic character because the authorities wanted the new cathedral to blend with the old one. Thus the new cathedral was constructed, continuing with Gothic style during the 17th and 18th centuries. However, during the 18th century, two elements were added that broke with the showy form with the predominant style of the building: a Baroque cupola on the transept and the final stages of the bell tower (92 m). The new cathedral was constructed without the subsequent destruction of the old cathedral as normally happened but a wall of the new cathedral, leans on the North wall of the old one. For this reason, the old cathedral had to be reinforced, and the bell tower was constructed on the old one. Two of the main architects of the cathedral were Juan Gil de Hontañón and his son Rodrigo Gil de Hontañón in 1538.

Cracks and broken windows are visible reminders of the devastating effects of the 1755 Lisbon earthquake, still visible today. After the earthquake, repairs were necessary to the cupola and the base of the tower which were reinforced with a lining of lines of sillares, in the form of a pyramid trunk that spoiled the basic profile of the tower (this tower is a virtual twin of the tower of the cathedral of Segovia). The moment of this catastrophe is commemorated with the 'Mariquelo' tradition on October 31, when every year residents climb to the cupola high above and play flutes and drums.

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Details

Founded: 1513-1733
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rufous Harford (10 months ago)
Two cathedrals - the old one from the 13th C that's still a bit wonky after the Lisbon earthquake of 1755, and the 'new' one from the 16th C that's bolted onto the old. Look for the astronaut carved into the wall decorations on the outside wall of the new one. Both stunning.
Michael Dobbs (11 months ago)
Amazing place, you have to pay to look inside though?
Oliver Page (11 months ago)
Stunning. Celestial. Gothic cathedral to match Leon and Borgos.
Lolla T (12 months ago)
This place is really cool. When you walk in it gives you a nice chill compared to what it feels likes outside. You are able to buy tickets and take a tour around the place and it is worth it. Recommend to come here if you are interested in learning about religion.
mike yong (12 months ago)
Visited about 1330hr; minimum visitors. Both exterior & interior were amazing. (The astronaut & dragon with gelato were amusing). €6 for entry to both New & Old Cathedrals. Audio guide (inclusive in entry fee) was very informative. Spent about 3 hours absorbing the historical & architectural details!
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