New Cathedral of Salamanca

Salamanca, Spain

The New Cathedral is located adjacent to the Old Cathedral in Salamanca. It was constructed between the 16th and 18th centuries in two styles: late Gothic and Baroque. Building began in 1513 and the cathedral was consecrated in 1733.

The building began at a time when the gothic style was becoming less popular and was merging with the new Renaissance style, giving the resulting Plateresque style in Spain. However, this cathedral retained more of its Gothic character because the authorities wanted the new cathedral to blend with the old one. Thus the new cathedral was constructed, continuing with Gothic style during the 17th and 18th centuries. However, during the 18th century, two elements were added that broke with the showy form with the predominant style of the building: a Baroque cupola on the transept and the final stages of the bell tower (92 m). The new cathedral was constructed without the subsequent destruction of the old cathedral as normally happened but a wall of the new cathedral, leans on the North wall of the old one. For this reason, the old cathedral had to be reinforced, and the bell tower was constructed on the old one. Two of the main architects of the cathedral were Juan Gil de Hontañón and his son Rodrigo Gil de Hontañón in 1538.

Cracks and broken windows are visible reminders of the devastating effects of the 1755 Lisbon earthquake, still visible today. After the earthquake, repairs were necessary to the cupola and the base of the tower which were reinforced with a lining of lines of sillares, in the form of a pyramid trunk that spoiled the basic profile of the tower (this tower is a virtual twin of the tower of the cathedral of Segovia). The moment of this catastrophe is commemorated with the 'Mariquelo' tradition on October 31, when every year residents climb to the cupola high above and play flutes and drums.

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Details

Founded: 1513-1733
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Heather B (8 months ago)
Mind-blowingly huge and ornate. It's hard to imagine how something like this was created without modern machinery. Worth paying for the self-guided tour of the New and Old Cathedrals and the separate tour (self-guided) of the ramparts. For the tour of the ramparts, enter through the small door of the Old Cathedral. For the main tour, enter through the very large main doors.
Peter Morgan (8 months ago)
A must visit place. A magnificent example of medieval craftsmanship and a place of worship. My few photos do not do the cathedral justice. Have english audio guides and reasonable price 6 Euro per person
oo0liesel0oo (8 months ago)
Lovely beautiful and better in person than photos. Just a small stroll from playa major. Did not go inside though. Worth a view. Massive.
Motorhome Quest (10 months ago)
We enjoyed the experience as you walk from the new cathedral into the old. QR codes help guide you around. You may notice that there are people walking around higher up in the new cathedral but there is a separate pay entrance outside for access only to this area.
Jelle (10 months ago)
Nice cathedral entry fee is around 6euro, gives you a good view over the city. If you're afraid of heights, better skip this one. The view especially for photography is good
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