Gergeti Trinity Church

Gergeti, Georgia

Gergeti Trinity Church is situated on the right bank of the river Chkheri (the left tributary of the river Terek), at an elevation of 2170 meters, under Mount Kazbegi.

The Gergeti Trinity Church was built in the 14th century, and is the only cross-cupola church in Khevi province. The separate belltower dates from the same period as the church itself. Its isolated location on top of a steep mountain surrounded by the vastness of nature has made it a symbol for Georgia. The 18th century Georgian author Vakhushti Batonishvili wrote that in times of danger, precious relics from Mtskheta, including Saint Nino's Cross were brought here for safekeeping. During the Soviet era, all religious services were prohibited, but the church remained a popular tourist destination. The church is now an active establishment of the Georgian Orthodox and Apostolic Church

The church is a popular waypoint for trekkers in the area, and can be reached by a steep 1 1/2 hour climb up the mountain, or around 30 minutes by jeep up a rough mountain trail.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Candice Ru (18 months ago)
It’s actually bigger than I thought and have 3 rooms inside the church. One room have a stream and one room have a ray of sunshine. The second floor of the church was amazing. It has a special echo effect and when you sing it’ll be more beautiful. It’s a world culture heritage and definitely worth visiting!
Renny Lobo (18 months ago)
Located on the high range of Georgia, surrounded by snowing mountains, beautiful scenery breath taking scenic beauty. Fresh air makes you happy and refreshed. Unfortunately just missed by chance to enjoy it completely due to sudden change of weather.
Angus (19 months ago)
If you can walk up do it. It’s an easy drive and the walk will make it feel more special. Try to head up when it’s quiet (start/end of day) as it can get very busy with cars and other visitors.
Anatoly Lifshits (19 months ago)
It very nice place to visit. Beautiful views. Climbing is not easy and take one hour for adults. A way back depends on your speed. Better to do it at morning and without clouds.
ariana lauren (21 months ago)
So absolutely cool! What a total gem this church, and the country of Georgia is. This was a fantastic experience that I can't wait to share with more people. Easy enough hike for healthy adventurers. Those that aren't, book an inexpensive trek up in a van. Our guide didn't speak a touch of English, but did speak Russian. His driving would've had me arrested back home. Glad we made it safely to and from even if I was totally in edge both literally and figuratively speaking. Would be happier to walk next time, maybe. It does get windy. So, keep that in mind. Be respectful of the areas they ask you not to photograph too.
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