Moreruela Abbey is situated to the west of Granja de Moreruela, about 35 kilometres north of the town of Zamora close to the left bank of the Esla, a tributary of the Duero.

Before the time of the Cistercians, a monastery of the Benedictines already stood on the site, founded for them either by the Asturian King Alfonso III or by Saint Froilan, which under the patronage of Alfonso VII the Cistercians took over. The date of this takeover is often put at 1131/1133, which would make Moreruela the earliest Cistercian foundation in Spain. There is however an alternative theory which dates the establishment of the Cistercians here at 1143.

Moreruela was a daughter house of Clairvaux, and in its turn was the mother house of Nogales Abbey, also in Spain (1164), and Aguiar Abbey in Portugal (1165).

There are many remains of the abbey, although in ruins, particularly the Romanesque abbey church in the shape of a Latin cross 63 metres long, the construction of which was begun about 1170 and finished in the second quarter of the 13th century. The apse at the east end is completely preserved and has a vaulted ambulatory round a rectangular choir, with seven chapels as at Clairvaux. Also preserved are the walls of the 27 metres wide transept and of the northern aisle, and parts of the nave, once comprising three aisles and nine bays. Of the conventual buildings to the north of the church, the chapter house among others remains, although partly reconstructed.

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Founded: c. 1131
Category: Religious sites in Spain

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Carmen Benavides (2 years ago)
Very close to the Villafáfila lagoons, although the area of ​​the church's altar is in ruins, it is impressive. The environment is very pleasant and worth visiting. The person in charge is very friendly and gives you information about the monastery and helped us find a place to eat.
aurópolis (2 years ago)
M A R A V I L L O S O
Bárbara María Calvo Robles (2 years ago)
Astoundingly beautiful. Hard to believe there was such an enormous place in the middle of nowhere centuries ago. The remaining a are impressive. A must-see.
Luis Martin (3 years ago)
It is a real beautiful pass and in recent years with the restorations that have been carried out it looks even more spectacular! Your visit is highly recommended!
José Sánchez (3 years ago)
The visit is worth it. An exceptional location for the Cistercian monastery, founded in the 12th century. Despite the abandonment and looting over many years, the ruins are consolidated and allow an idea of ​​the grandeur of the complex in its heyday.
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