Medinaceli Castle

Medinaceli, Spain

Medinaceli Castle was built in the 9th century and rebuilt in the 15th century. There aren’t many remains left of this castle which was of great importance during the Middle Ages. According to legends, inside the castle, which is now completely restored, there was an Arabic citadel where Al-Mansur was buried after being defeated and killed in the Battle of Calatañazor in 1002, although, there aren’t any remains of this citadel.

The strategic situation of Medinaceli, in the middle of the Jalón River valley, the natural passageway between Aragon and the Castilian Plateau, turned it into a key battleground between Muslims and Christians. Legend has it that Al-Mansur, the “Invincible” died here and was buried “in the depths of hell”. El Cid took over the city, which was under Muslim domain, and was lucky enough that there was an exceptional chronicler that immortalised him in art form. According to Menéndez Vidal, one of the minstrels of Cantar del Mío Cid was from Medinaceli or from this region.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Antonio Ocejo (5 months ago)
I am restoring it
Jörge (12 months ago)
Consolidated ruins of the old castle. Inside is the cemetery
Jörge (12 months ago)
Consolidated ruins of the old castle. Inside is the cemetery
Tony Prats (20 months ago)
It is a place that deserves the few kilometers that must be diverted to make a half-hour visit. Walking through its streets is to relive history. From the highway you can see the Roman arch, it is one of three arches, nothing normal. There are several restaurants where you can eat.
Tony Prats (20 months ago)
It is a place that deserves the few kilometers that must be diverted to make a half-hour visit. Walking through its streets is to relive history. From the highway you can see the Roman arch, it is one of three arches, nothing normal. There are several restaurants where you can eat.
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