Medinaceli Castle

Medinaceli, Spain

Medinaceli Castle was built in the 9th century and rebuilt in the 15th century. There aren’t many remains left of this castle which was of great importance during the Middle Ages. According to legends, inside the castle, which is now completely restored, there was an Arabic citadel where Al-Mansur was buried after being defeated and killed in the Battle of Calatañazor in 1002, although, there aren’t any remains of this citadel.

The strategic situation of Medinaceli, in the middle of the Jalón River valley, the natural passageway between Aragon and the Castilian Plateau, turned it into a key battleground between Muslims and Christians. Legend has it that Al-Mansur, the “Invincible” died here and was buried “in the depths of hell”. El Cid took over the city, which was under Muslim domain, and was lucky enough that there was an exceptional chronicler that immortalised him in art form. According to Menéndez Vidal, one of the minstrels of Cantar del Mío Cid was from Medinaceli or from this region.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eric Roels (3 months ago)
Groot kasteel! Zou veel mooier zijn mocht er rondom een mooie tuin aangelegd worden!
Rodrigo Brasero (3 months ago)
It is a cemetery
Vagandopormundopolis (6 months ago)
Before this castle there was an Arab citadel and it is assumed that Almanzor was buried here, although his tomb has not yet been found. The current castle is from the s. XII in its interior is the municipal cemetery. Surround the castle since in the back there are some viewpoints from where you have very cool views.
JOSE MANUEL SANZ BURGOS (8 months ago)
Spectacular "Castellum" of Roman origin, whose stones have been modified in medieval history. Nearby is a ROMAN triumphal arch.
Antonio Ocejo (9 months ago)
I am restoring it
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