Montuenga Castle in Soria, Spain forms part of the defensive line of the Jalón River set in a natural passage between the plateau and strategic basin of the Ebro. The area was subject to disputes, notable during the Castilian Civil War.

The castle is perched on a high hill, steep and long, from which it dominates the town of Montuenga de Soria. The remains of the building, two polygonal towers at each end, are joined by walls.

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Founded: Middle ages
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alvaro Sison Larena (2 years ago)
Good place to go with my family on vacation I don't give it 5 stars because Andrea's roof is a bit uncomfortable
Evolución Natural (2 years ago)
Traces of our medieval history.
Dory Bueno Lazaro (2 years ago)
It's very good, it's worth seeing.
andre richardson (3 years ago)
This stop was EXACTLY the reason we chose to do a road trip through Spain. The wonderful little old towns and so many of these old lookout structures everywhere! We stopped at Montuenga because it seemed more accessible and closer than others we had passed. It wasn't preserved as well as some others we saw from a distance but the experience was worth it all the same. You can't be afraid to get out a do a little trekking if you want to experience life so bring some good shoes!
andre richardson (3 years ago)
This stop was EXACTLY the reason we chose to do a road trip through Spain. The wonderful little old towns and so many of these old lookout structures everywhere! We stopped at Montuenga because it seemed more accessible and closer than others we had passed. It wasn't preserved as well as some others we saw from a distance but the experience was worth it all the same. You can't be afraid to get out a do a little trekking if you want to experience life so bring some good shoes!
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