Pelisor Palace

Sinaia, Romania

Pelișor Palace was built in 1899–1902 by order of King Carol I, as the residence for his nephew and heir, the future King Ferdinand (son of Carol's brother Leopold von Hohenzollern) and Ferdinand's consort Queen Marie.

In 2006, it was decided that the entire complex, including Pelișor, long a museum and tourist site, is the legal property of the King Michael I of Romania. The royal family was to assume legal possession of it and lease it to the Romanian state, so that it will remain in its current status. The main castle of Peleș is already under lease, but negotiations for other villas and chateaus are ongoing. King Michael I of Romania maintained that Pelișor would remain a private residence for the royal family.

Pelișor was designed by the Czech architect Karel Liman in the Art Nouveau style; the furniture and the interior decorations were designed mostly by the Viennese Bernhard Ludwig. There are several chambers, working cabinets, a chapel, and 'the golden room'. Queen Marie herself, an accomplished artist, made many of the artistic decisions about the design of the palace, and participated in its decoration, including as a painter. Queen Marie considered Art Nouveau a weapon against sterile historicism, creating a personal style combining Art-Nouveau elements with Byzantine and Celtic elements.

Pelișor Castle hosts today a museum.

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Details

Founded: 1899-1902
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Romania

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vladislav Busmachiu (4 months ago)
A definitely a place to visit when you are traveling to Romania. The beauty of the surroundings. Wonderful castle which were built constructed between 1873 (start of construction) and 1914 (completed).The alley to get to the palace with the river to the left, the beauty of the castle are things that will first enjoy your spirit. Then, once entered in the palace, all the manual work invested for all small things, all furniture and objects are things that cannot be expressed in simple words. There is a small access fee in to the castle, but it is totally worth it. You get a good tour through the whole castle. Parking available nearby the castle.
Alexandra Birtar (4 months ago)
Maybe the traffic will influence you, but I assure you that once getting here, you will not be disappointed. The beauty of the surroundings... The alley to get to the palace with the river to the left, the beauty of the castle are things that will first enjoy your spirit. Then, once entered in the palace, all the manual work invested for all small things, all furniture and objects are things that cannot be expressed in simple words. I encourage all to go there and take the history lesson! :)
Simona Arriens (5 months ago)
After watching Queen Marie of Romania, my polish partner and I wanted to visit this wonderful place.. for me it was the second time. The outside is fairytale like and the inside is charming! Worth seeing both floors if you want to imagine all the royalty roaming the stairs and the very modern for those time equipment.
Kevin Dean (6 months ago)
Every room had its own magic and the tour meant that you were never quite sure where you were going and so it became a series of glorious surprises. I liked the information offered on each room. Enough to point out key features but not too much that you spent ages reading.
Joseph Donohue (7 months ago)
Great English speaking tour guide. Amazing, magnificent castle, super interesting features and architectures. Reasonably priced, and amenities for eating and drinking, in possibly one of the most beautiful areas within this part of Romania.
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