Sinaia Monastery

Sinaia, Romania

Situated in the Prahova Valley, the Sinaia Monastery gave its name to the nearby town of Sinaia. Prince (Spătarul) Mihail Cantacuzino founded the monastery upon his return from a pilgrimage to Mount Sinai. The first buildings were completed between 1690 and 1695. It was designed to serve as a monastery as well as a fortified stronghold on the route from Brasov to Bucharest.

In the midst of the Russo–Turkish War, 1735–1739, before deserting the monastery, monks hid the valuables by burying them inside a bell. During a battle, the Turks defeated troops stationed within the walls of the monastery. The Ottomans burned the area and broke through the wall in two places.

Until 1850, Sinaia consisted of little more than the monastery and a group of huts. In 1864, however, the monastic estate was assigned to the Board of Civil Hospitals (Eforia Spitalelor Civile), which opened a hospital and several baths, and helped develop mineral springsin Sinaia.

The monastery consists of two courtyards surrounded by low buildings. In the centre of each courtyard there is a small church built in the Byzantine style. One of them—'Biserica Veche' (The Old Church)—dates from 1695, while the more recent 'Biserica Mare' (The Great Church) was built in 1846.

The monks possess a library that is a repository for valuable jewels belonging to the Cantacuzino family, as well as the earliest Romanian translation of the Bible, dated 1668.

In 1895 the museum of the monastery was opened, the first exhibition of religious objects in Romania. It holds collections of icons and crosses from the 17th century, the very first Bible in Romanian (Bucharest, 1688), and many other precious objects.

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Details

Founded: 1690
Category: Religious sites in Romania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sinziana Mazilu (12 months ago)
It is a must see gem of Sinaia. We didn't know that this place gave actually the name and established Sinaia as a place. Very nice history, and the old.little.church is the most beautiful architectural jewelry around the area. It is unique and it is very _cute_. The architecture enthusiasts will love it. I found out after this visit there is also a museum with many historical valuables (the first Romanian Bible), which is worth visiting.
Vali Charlie (12 months ago)
It's just a regular monastery, the old wooden church located in the same yard has much more history and is more interesting.
Abhijit Phadtare (14 months ago)
Beautiful structure and artwork! Try and visit on weekdays to experience a quiet, peaceful and relaxing atmosphere. Sundays are a bit crowded.
Aura P. (2 years ago)
Beautiful 16th century Orthodox monastery.
Adina Munteanu (2 years ago)
It is a nice place to visit. Ne mindful of the parking, there are limited spaces on the same street, higher relatively to the monastery. In August, the souvenir shops was very poorly stocked.
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