Sinaia Monastery

Sinaia, Romania

Situated in the Prahova Valley, the Sinaia Monastery gave its name to the nearby town of Sinaia. Prince (Spătarul) Mihail Cantacuzino founded the monastery upon his return from a pilgrimage to Mount Sinai. The first buildings were completed between 1690 and 1695. It was designed to serve as a monastery as well as a fortified stronghold on the route from Brasov to Bucharest.

In the midst of the Russo–Turkish War, 1735–1739, before deserting the monastery, monks hid the valuables by burying them inside a bell. During a battle, the Turks defeated troops stationed within the walls of the monastery. The Ottomans burned the area and broke through the wall in two places.

Until 1850, Sinaia consisted of little more than the monastery and a group of huts. In 1864, however, the monastic estate was assigned to the Board of Civil Hospitals (Eforia Spitalelor Civile), which opened a hospital and several baths, and helped develop mineral springsin Sinaia.

The monastery consists of two courtyards surrounded by low buildings. In the centre of each courtyard there is a small church built in the Byzantine style. One of them—'Biserica Veche' (The Old Church)—dates from 1695, while the more recent 'Biserica Mare' (The Great Church) was built in 1846.

The monks possess a library that is a repository for valuable jewels belonging to the Cantacuzino family, as well as the earliest Romanian translation of the Bible, dated 1668.

In 1895 the museum of the monastery was opened, the first exhibition of religious objects in Romania. It holds collections of icons and crosses from the 17th century, the very first Bible in Romanian (Bucharest, 1688), and many other precious objects.

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Details

Founded: 1690
Category: Religious sites in Romania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jacob Nørgaard (11 months ago)
Very pretty monastery, but we did not venture inside.
Gina Natera (11 months ago)
Enjoyed visiting and listening the guide give us Abit of background... Souvenirs are at a great price
Silvia Serra (12 months ago)
To see Take Ionescu 's resting place it was a pleasure. He was great prime minister. Wonderful history of Romania.
The Trickster (13 months ago)
Love it. Very beautiful pictures and the interior is amazing. Not to talk about the exterior. You need to see this monastery!
Tatiana Vinograd (15 months ago)
A peaceful place in the beautiful mountain area, I felt welcomed inside this old but still working monastery. Very interesting restored paintings outside the entrance to the small old church in the middle of the monks living area. There is a handy tourist street train to get to the place located higher on the mount. Not to miss out if passing Sinai!
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