Kamenica Tumulus

Kamenicë, Albania

Kamenica Tumulus is located in the side of the Kamenica hills in the southern side of the Korçë Plain. The excavations showed that the Tumulus of Kamenica represents the largest burial monument of its kind in relation to 200 tumuli excavated in Albania and neighboring Balkan countries.

The central grave, which dates back to the Bronze Age (13th century BC) is surrounded by two large concentric circles unlike any other tumuli discovered in Albania. The tumulus grew to 40 graves in the Late Bronze Age (1200-1050 BC) and to 200 in the Early Iron Age(1050-750 BC). The tumulus grew further until the 7th century BC until it took an elliptical shape with dimensions of 70 m X 50 m. During the excavation campaign more than 400 graves, 440 skeletons, and 3,500 archaeological objects were found.

Looters heavily damaged the site during the 1997-1999 period following the 1997 rebellion in Albania, which was followed by an interdisciplinary work performed in the 2000-2002 period by the Albanian Institute of Archaeology, the Albanian Rescue Archaeology Unit, and the Museum of Korçë and aimed at excavation campaigns.

The museum is a portico style building, made of wood. It includes panels with the history of the excavation. Of particular interest is the illustration of the surgery of a male cranium, performed in the 6th century BC, which shows the advanced medical knowledge of the community that lived in the area at that time. The museum also includes two replica graves with the original remains.

Recently archaeologists have also found in one of the graves the skeleton of a pregnant woman and her unborn child dating to 3000 BC.

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Address

SH75, Kamenicë, Albania
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Details

Founded: 1300-1200 BCE
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Albania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yjët ë agimit - EcoHostel in Albania (2 years ago)
A little but interesting archeological site. The museum is well done and the explanations of the guide were very good, in English. Entrance is 200 lek. Timetable is: 8:00-16:00 except monday. But you can just show up (it's Albania...!) You are very closed of the items. It's well preserved. The biggest tumulus in Europe just there!
vil t (2 years ago)
Nice place but needs some experts to be there
Valerie Moermans (2 years ago)
A very nice museum with clear explanation about the discovery of the Albanian old civilization.
Taulanti's Guide (2 years ago)
The end of the excavations showed that the Tumulus of Kamenica represents the largest burial monument of its kind in relation to 200 tumuli excavated in Albania and neighboring Balkan countries. The central grave, which dates back to the Bronze Age (13th century BC) is surrounded by two large concentric circles unlike any other tumuli discovered in Albania. The tumulus grew to 40 graves in the Late Bronze Age (1200-1050 BC) and to 200 in the Early Iron Age (1050-750 BC).The tumulus grew further until the 7th century BC until it took an elliptical shape with dimensions of 70 m X 50 m. During the excavation campaign more than 400 graves, 440 skeletons, and 3,500 archaeological objects were found.
Arno Jägers (3 years ago)
Worth visiting if you're near Korce. Next to the prehistoric burial site is a little museum that has displays in both Albanian and English. One skeleton that is displayed is of a woman who was at the start of the 9th month of her pregnancy. The skeleton of the foetus was still inside her womb.
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