Spökprästgården Borgvattnet

Borgvattnet, Sweden

Borgvattnet is most renowned for its old vicarage which was built in 1876, and is reputed to be a haunted house. The first documented mentioning of ghosts in the vicarage is in a letter dated 1927 which was written by chaplain Nils Hedlund who lived in the house at the time. In the 1930s, Hedlund's successor, chaplain Rudolf Tängdén, claimed to have seen the ghost of a woman in the house, and in the 1940s the subsequent chaplain, Otto Lindgren, and his wife said they experienced paranormal activity including weird sounds and moving objects.

In 1941 a woman who visited the vicarage woke up one night in the guestroom to see that she was not alone. Three old women were sitting in a sofa staring at her in the dark room. She turned on the light and the three ghosts were still there but appeared to be more blurry.

In 1945, chaplain Erik Lindgren moved into the vicarage and he started writing down in his journal all the strange things he experienced. Lindgren had bought a rocking chair which he brought to the vicarage. However, he was never able to sit in his chair very long without being thrown out of it by an invisible force.

Ghost Hunters International has investigated the place and aired the episode in their first season in January 2009.

Tore Forslund or the ghostpriest was a controversial priest who worked in Borgvattnet 1981 and he offered the village to relieve Borgvattnet from the ghosts that was said to accommodate the old parsonage. He was also strongly against the occult phenomena that existed in the district. Disappointed at not being able to meet the accusations the cathedral chapter had against him he decided to leave the Church of Sweden in 1981.

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Linn Trondsen (2 years ago)
Dårlig service, masse tull med nøklene, som «var borte». Måtte kjøre opp og ned før vi fikk de, etter beskjed fra eier. Da vi endelig fant nøklene, var butikken stengt, og eierne borte, og ingen informasjon ble gitt. Ellers Ok rom, ingen spøkelser.
caroline uhlgrén (2 years ago)
Helt underbar plats. Spöken finns. Personal helt underbara.
caroline uhlgren (2 years ago)
Hit kommer jag åka igen. Personal underbar. Kände av några här inne.
Bumgb (3 years ago)
Really scary place not recommended for people who get scared easily
Jack Lambert (4 years ago)
Beautiful but creepy!
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