Monte Ursino Castle

Noli, Italy

The Mount Ursino Castle was destroyed by a fire around 900 and rebuilt on the hill.  It is mentioned in 1004 in a document and defined fortified village. After the construction of a first tower on top of the hill, the fortress was enlarged repeatedly until reaching its present form around the 15th century, embracing even the baby village in the Piana, current historical center, while it was gradually abandoned that in hill. Supporters of this structure medieval military were mainly the Del Carretto family, the feudal lords of Noli. The castle was able to control both the sea and the coast that the old Roman road passing in the hill in the locality of Voze, and used until the 18th century.

The castle is formed on the top by a cylindrical tower, surrounded by massive walls and from the accommodation for the troop. From this main core descended two walled perimeters, largely still preserved today, which embraced the whole hill and subsequently also the village downstream. Circular towers susseguivano it at regular intervals along the sloping walls on the sides of the Monte Ursino. The access doors were defended by a singular system still today partly preserved that was constituted by an external tower to walls and connected thereto via a walkway in masonry. This allowed to defend the access doors from the outside by hitting enemies from behind. The castle and the walls of the village are among the examples of medieval fortification best preserved in the Ligurian Ponente.

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Address

Regione Zuglieno 74, Noli, Italy
See all sites in Noli

Details

Founded: 10th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.e-borghi.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

carlondon london (7 months ago)
I really enjoyed walking up the hill to reach the Castle. You can walk along old houses and there is a beautiful view of Noli. There are different type of Mediterranean plants that you can see and smell. Otherwise it was Sunday (08/11/2020) and the castle was closed (due to the coronavirus), but I don't think there is much to see inside.
Riccardo Radice (11 months ago)
Nice castle ruins, quick to visit, lovely sea view. Tickets €2 per adult.
Francesca Cerutti (2 years ago)
Non potete perdervi l'occasione di visitare un'attrazione così suggestiva e coinvolgente. Noli non è una semplice località marittima, ma nasconde in sè profonde radici storiche e culturali. Far visita al Castello di Monte Ursino vi permetterà di scoprire buona parte del passato medievale della costa ligure, grazie soprattutto all'indispensabile presenza e accoglienza dei volontari istruiti che supportano le attività culturali della zona nolese. Il Castello è purtroppo visitabile solo nei weekend e raggiungibile facilmente sia a piedi che con i mezzi.
Cristina Piccinino (2 years ago)
22/12/2018 Ho visitato il castello a fine giornata poco prima del tramonto. Panorama bellissimo, luogo tenuto in ordine esemplare grazie al solo contributo di volontari. Uno di loro, storico, si è offerto di accompagnarci. Competenza, leggerezza...molto piacevole. Andateci!!! Cristina
Alexander Fagerheim Lyngsnes (2 years ago)
Only saw the outside as the castle was closed, but the view of Noli and the surrounding coast was great
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