Monte Ursino Castle

Noli, Italy

The Mount Ursino Castle was destroyed by a fire around 900 and rebuilt on the hill.  It is mentioned in 1004 in a document and defined fortified village. After the construction of a first tower on top of the hill, the fortress was enlarged repeatedly until reaching its present form around the 15th century, embracing even the baby village in the Piana, current historical center, while it was gradually abandoned that in hill. Supporters of this structure medieval military were mainly the Del Carretto family, the feudal lords of Noli. The castle was able to control both the sea and the coast that the old Roman road passing in the hill in the locality of Voze, and used until the 18th century.

The castle is formed on the top by a cylindrical tower, surrounded by massive walls and from the accommodation for the troop. From this main core descended two walled perimeters, largely still preserved today, which embraced the whole hill and subsequently also the village downstream. Circular towers susseguivano it at regular intervals along the sloping walls on the sides of the Monte Ursino. The access doors were defended by a singular system still today partly preserved that was constituted by an external tower to walls and connected thereto via a walkway in masonry. This allowed to defend the access doors from the outside by hitting enemies from behind. The castle and the walls of the village are among the examples of medieval fortification best preserved in the Ligurian Ponente.

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Address

Regione Zuglieno 74, Noli, Italy
See all sites in Noli

Details

Founded: 10th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.e-borghi.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

carlondon london (2 years ago)
I really enjoyed walking up the hill to reach the Castle. You can walk along old houses and there is a beautiful view of Noli. There are different type of Mediterranean plants that you can see and smell. Otherwise it was Sunday (08/11/2020) and the castle was closed (due to the coronavirus), but I don't think there is much to see inside.
Riccardo Radice (2 years ago)
Nice castle ruins, quick to visit, lovely sea view. Tickets €2 per adult.
Francesca Cerutti (3 years ago)
Non potete perdervi l'occasione di visitare un'attrazione così suggestiva e coinvolgente. Noli non è una semplice località marittima, ma nasconde in sè profonde radici storiche e culturali. Far visita al Castello di Monte Ursino vi permetterà di scoprire buona parte del passato medievale della costa ligure, grazie soprattutto all'indispensabile presenza e accoglienza dei volontari istruiti che supportano le attività culturali della zona nolese. Il Castello è purtroppo visitabile solo nei weekend e raggiungibile facilmente sia a piedi che con i mezzi.
Cristina Piccinino (3 years ago)
22/12/2018 Ho visitato il castello a fine giornata poco prima del tramonto. Panorama bellissimo, luogo tenuto in ordine esemplare grazie al solo contributo di volontari. Uno di loro, storico, si è offerto di accompagnarci. Competenza, leggerezza...molto piacevole. Andateci!!! Cristina
Alexander Fagerheim Lyngsnes (3 years ago)
Only saw the outside as the castle was closed, but the view of Noli and the surrounding coast was great
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Lorca Castle

Castle of Lorca (Castillo de Lorca) is a fortress of medieval origin constructed between the 9th and 15th centuries. It consists of a series of defensive structures that, during the Middle Ages, made the town and the fortress an impregnable point in the southeast part of the Iberian Peninsula. Lorca Castle was a key strategic point of contention between Christians and Muslims during the Reconquista.

Archaeological excavations have revealed that the site of the castle has been inhabited since Neolithic times.

Muslim Era

It has not been determined exactly when a castle or fortress was first built on the hill. The first written documentation referring to a castle at Lorca is of Muslim origin, which in the 9th century, indicates that the city of Lurqa was an important town in the area ruled by Theudimer (Tudmir). During Muslim rule, Lorca Castle was an impregnable fortress and its interior was divided into two sections by the Espaldón Wall. In the western part, there was an area used to protect livestock and grain in times of danger. The eastern part had a neighbourhood called the barrio de Alcalá.

After Reconquista

Lorca was conquered by the Castilian Infante Don Alfonso, the future Alfonso X, in 1244, and the fortress became a key defensive point against the Kingdom of Granada. For 250 years, Lorca Castle was a watchpoint on the border between the Christian kingdom of Murcia and the Muslim state of Granada.

Alfonso X ordered the construction of the towers known as the Alfonsina and Espolón Towers, and strengthened and fixed the walls. Hardly a trace of the Muslim fortress remained due to this reconstruction. Muslim traces remain in the foundation stones and the wall known as the muro del Espaldón.

The Jewish Quarter was found within the alcazaba, the Moorish fortification, separated from the rest of the city by its walls. The physical separation had the purpose of protecting the Jewish people in the town from harm, but also had the result of keeping Christians and Jews separate, with the Christians inhabiting the lower part of town.

The remains of the Jewish Quarter extended over an area of 5,700 square m, and 12 homes and a synagogue have been found; the synagogue dates from the 14th century and is the only one found in the Murcia. The streets of the town had an irregular layout, adapted to the landscape, and is divided into four terraces. The synagogue was in the central location, and around it were the homes. The homes were of rectangular shape, with various compartmentalized rooms. The living quarters were elevated and a common feature was benches attached to the walls, kitchens, stand for earthenware jars, or cupboards.

Modern history

With the disappearance of the frontier after the conquest of Granada in 1492, Lorca Castle no longer became as important as before. With the expulsion of the Jews by order of Ferdinand and Isabella, Lorca Castle was also depopulated as a result. The castle was abandoned completely, and was almost a complete ruin by the 18th century. In the 19th century, the castle was refurbished due to the War of Spanish Independence. The walls and structures were repaired or modified and its medieval look changed. A battery of cannons was installed, for example, during this time. In 1931 Lorca Castle was declared a National Historic Monument.

Currently, a parador (luxury hotel) has been built within the castle. As a result, archaeological discoveries have been found, including the Jewish Quarter.