Built on solid rock inside the spectacular protected area Xuvia-Castro, Naraío Castle dates from 14th century. Neverthless, it is said that the remains we can see nowadays are the result of the reconstruction of an ancient fortress.

The precious castle was an unconquerable fortress. To get to the tower of homage we have to cross two doors where can still be seen the Andrade´s coat of arms. Around the tower were found several arqueological remains.

Without a doubt, the most impressive view is obtained from the other side of the river. There, we can appreciate parts of the old walls, the towers and the butresses, that gave its unquestionable defensive nature.

This castle is 12 kilometers away from Moeche Castle. Between the two monuments runs a route that, starting in Moeche, goes through the path of destruction followed by the irmandiños in this territory.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.eumeturismo.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carmela (14 months ago)
Nature and history ... There is access to the Tower and some beautiful views. there are trails to travel near the river
samu mm (14 months ago)
Bonito para dar paseo por los alrededores
Maria Jose Alvarez López (15 months ago)
It is not rebuilt but if they try to prevent it from deteriorating
JUAN MARTINEZ (15 months ago)
14th century castle, you can climb the Tower and the views are spectacular
Javier Perez (2 years ago)
Hidden gem off the beaten track. Amazing waterfall-pool nearby.
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