Tower of Hercules

A Coruña, Spain

The Tower of Hercules (Torre de Hércules) is an ancient Roman lighthouse on a peninsula about 2.4 km from the centre of A Coruña. The structure is 55 metres (180 ft) tall and overlooks the North Atlantic coast of Spain. It has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2009. It is the second-tallest lighthouse in Spain.

The tower is known to have existed by the 2nd century, built or perhaps rebuilt under Trajan, possibly on foundations following a design that was Phoenician in origin. It is thought to be modeled after the Lighthouse of Alexandria. Its base preserves a cornerstone with the inscription MARTI AUG.SACR C.SEVIVS LVPVS ARCHTECTVS AEMINIENSIS LVSITANVS.EX.VO, permitting the original lighthouse tower to be ascribed to the architect Gaius Sevius Lupus, from Aeminium (present-day Coimbra, Portugal) in the former province of Lusitania, as an offering dedicated to the Roman god of war, Mars.

The tower has been in constant use since the 2nd century and is considered to be the oldest extant lighthouse. The base of the building has 8 sides, the tower is 4 sided, continuing to be 8 sided with a final dome on top.

In 1788, the original, three-storey tower was given a neoclassical restoration, including a new 21-metre fourth storey. The restoration was finished in 1791. Within, the much-repaired Roman and medieval masonry may be inspected.

Myths

Through the millennia many mythical stories of the lighthouse's origin have been told. According to a myth that mixes Celtic and Greco-Roman elements, the hero Hercules slew the giant tyrant Geryon after three days and three nights of continuous battle. Hercules then—in a Celtic gesture—buried the head of Geryon with his weapons and ordered that a city be built on the site. The lighthouse atop a skull and crossbones representing the buried head of Hercules’ slain enemy appears in the coat-of-arms of the city of Coruña.

Another legend embodied in the 11th-century Irish compilation Lebor Gabála Érenn King Breogán, the founding father of the Galician Celtic nation, constructed a massive tower of such a grand height that his sons could see a distant green shore from its top. The glimpse of that distant green land lured them to sail north to Ireland. According to the legend Breogán's descendants stayed in Ireland and are the Celtic ancestors of the current Irish people. A colossal statue of Breogán has been erected near the Tower.

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Founded: 2nd century AD
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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anne Mehta (12 months ago)
Nice coastal walk. Great to take our dog. We stated at the tower and walked east towards town
Juan Martin Maglione (12 months ago)
We visited Hercules Tower in August 2021z It was a windy but lovely trip to Coruña and getting up to the tower to have a panoramic view one the shore and the city. Luckily the weather was just perfect (windy as mentioned but VERY sunny), no raining which gave a special flavor to the experience. While being in Coruña don't forget enjoying the views and small walking paths that this Tower has to offer.
Veronica Avila (13 months ago)
This place is beautiful. The surrounding landscape is breathtaking. We didn't go up but we took a walk around and it was definitely worth it!
Stephen Higgins (13 months ago)
Lovely clean beach. Great walking. Amazing views. Building is impressive. Great place to go for a picnic.
Niyi Adeleye (2 years ago)
Any time I'm in the north of Spain, I come back to this spot, it's just magical, especially at sunset/sunrise. Personally I prefer the view from the nearby park rather than the tower itself, you can really see the waves crashing against the coast from there
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