Top Historic Sights in Osijek, Croatia

Explore the historic highlights of Osijek

Osijek Co-cathedral

The Church of St Peter and St Paul, the co-cathedral of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Đakovo-Osijek, is a neo-Gothic sacral structure located in Osijek. The multi-tiered 90-metre spire is one of the city"s landmarks. The church was built in 1898 on the initiative of the Bishop of Đakovo Josip Juraj Strossmayer. The church is entered via a small door to the right of the main portal, overlooked by a trio of gar ...
Founded: 1898 | Location: Osijek, Croatia

Museum of Slavonia

Museum of Slavonia is the largest general-type museum in Croatia. It was established in 1877 in Osijek. Since 1946, it is located in the City Magistracy building, constructed in 1702 for the purposes of the Vienna Chamber, town government and police. Today, among the museums numerous collections, the most prized are the Roman Mursa and numismatic collections. The Museum"s library contains more than 70,000 books.
Founded: 1877 | Location: Osijek, Croatia

Pejacevic Palace

Pejačević Castle is one of several country houses owned by the members of the Pejačević noble family in the region of Slavonia. According to the sign located on the, facade above the entrance, the manor was built by count Sigismund Pejačević in 1801, with the actual construction beginning somewhere around 1796. The Retfala Estate was acquired by the Pejačević Counts as a grant by the then Austrian Em ...
Founded: 1796-1801 | Location: Osijek, Croatia

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.