Osijek Co-cathedral

Osijek, Croatia

The Church of St Peter and St Paul, the co-cathedral of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Đakovo-Osijek, is a neo-Gothic sacral structure located in Osijek. The multi-tiered 90-metre spire is one of the city's landmarks. The church was built in 1898 on the initiative of the Bishop of Đakovo Josip Juraj Strossmayer.

The church is entered via a small door to the right of the main portal, overlooked by a trio of gargoyles. The interior is a treasure trove of neo-Gothic ornamentation, with a succession of pinnacled altars overlooked by exuberant stained glass windows. The interior was finished off in 1938–1942 when leading Croatian painter Mirko Rački covered the walls and ceilings with brightly coloured frescoes illustrating famous episodes from the Old and New Testaments.

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Details

Founded: 1898
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tiago Mokwa (2 years ago)
It's majestically beautiful. Simple as that.
Nikola Kudrna (2 years ago)
One of the most beautiful churches in Croatia, the Co-Cathedral of Osijek. It is located in the center of the city, near Drava river. Tram lines are passing in front of it and it is visible from bridges that are crossing Drava (the most famous one being pedastrian bridge).
Dubravka Mijakovac (2 years ago)
Beautiful chatedraral in center of Osijek. Nice experience!
NikkiReed961 (3 years ago)
A wonderful church! There were two weddings at the time we visited! An amazing experience! I highly recommend!
Dalibor Petricevic (3 years ago)
Now in interior reconstruction but really something to see. Piece of recent historie and quite monumental. Dominating center of the town.
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