Top Historic Sights in Christiansø, Denmark

Explore the historic highlights of Christiansø

Christiansø Church

Christiansø church was first consecrated in 1685 when the island's fortifications were completed. Serving the garrison, it was initially located in a small floor room in the fortification tower where it was used until 1821. It was then moved some two hundred metres to the east to its present location on an irregular quadrangular plot surrounded by fieldstone walls. The small rectangular granite building was rebuilt and ...
Founded: 1852 | Location: Christiansø, Denmark

Ertholmene Fortress

The first permanent inhabitation in Ertholmene, generally called Christiansø, was the result of the Danish-Swedish conflicts in the late 17th century. As Denmark needed a naval base in the central Baltic Sea, a fort was built on Christiansø and Frederiksø in 1684 which served as an outpost for the Danish Navy until 1855. The islands" external appearance has changed very little in over 300 years. ...
Founded: 1684 | Location: Christiansø, Denmark

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.