Ertholmene Fortress

Christiansø, Denmark

The first permanent inhabitation in Ertholmene, generally called Christiansø, was the result of the Danish-Swedish conflicts in the late 17th century. As Denmark needed a naval base in the central Baltic Sea, a fort was built on Christiansø and Frederiksø in 1684 which served as an outpost for the Danish Navy until 1855. The islands' external appearance has changed very little in over 300 years. Girdled by thick granite walls with old cannons pointed seaward, Christiansø is a picturesque tourist spot seemingly frozen in time. A former part of the fort, Store Tårn has housed the Christiansø Lighthouse for the past 200 years, and a small round tower on Frederiksø, Lille Tårn, serves as a museum.

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Christiansø, Denmark
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Details

Founded: 1684
Category: Castles and fortifications in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

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Old and Most wanted (9 months ago)
PUBG MOBILE ERANGLE MAP
Sakesh Namdev (10 months ago)
Thankful
PsychoFTW (10 months ago)
Erangle map
MOHMED ABRAAR (10 months ago)
This place looks like the “Enrangle” map from PUBG
Mohammed Khaled (11 months ago)
PUBG MOBILE
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