Top Historic Sights in Haderslev, Denmark

Explore the historic highlights of Haderslev

Haderslev Cathedral

Work on building Haderslev Cathedral began in the mid-13th century. It was originally a large cross-shaped single-naved church built of bricks and granite cubes recycled from an older church. Only the original transept is still standing. The church nave was soon expanded to include three tall naves under one roof. This type of church is called a hall church. The present three-naved choir from 1400 is one of the most beaut ...
Founded: c. 1250 | Location: Haderslev, Denmark

Duke Hans Hospital and Church

Duke Hans Hospital and Church (Hertug Hans Hospitalskirke) was established in 1569. It was not a hospital in today’s sense; we would call it a poorhouse. It was a place where poor and infirm elderly people could get free board and lodging when they could not fend for themselves and had no family to take care of them. It was far from luxurious, but they had a roof over their heads and were spared from having to beg. The ...
Founded: 1569 | Location: Haderslev, Denmark

Hammelev Church

Hammelev Church dates from the Middle Ages and it was enlarged with porch and sacristy in the 18th century.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Haderslev, Denmark

Old Haderslev Church

The old church of Haderslev (Gammel Haderslev Kirke) was uilt in the twelfth century as a Romanesque granite church, and the first tower was built in the Gothic time. The present tower is from 1911-12, but many changes have taken place through the centuries. The altar is made by granite. There is a wooden crucifix, and some brass-candlesticks from 1609. The frescos behind the altar have a motive from the Apocalypse. The ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Haderslev, Denmark

Halk Church

Halk church is a whitewashed church with a lead covered roof, which consists of a Romanesque choir and nave. Later, an expansion towards the west was added, as well as a sacristy, weaponhouse, chapel and an east facing tower, which is rarely seen. The alter tablet is a beautiful combination of parts from a late-gothic alter tablet, which has been inserted into a late-renaissance frame from around 1640. The church has ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Haderslev, Denmark

Fjelstrup Church

Fjelstrup church is a big whitewashed church built in late Romanesque style. It was built with large medieval bricks and consists of a chancel and a nave. The church has been expanded with several extensions in late gothic style: an expansion of the chancel, an addition to the north and a tower to the west. At a later period a vestry was added to the north. The nave has a flat plaster ceiling and the big chancel has been ...
Founded: c. 1200 | Location: Haderslev, Denmark

Jegerup Church

Jegerup church is a whitewashed Romanesque church with choir and nave. Two late-Gothic buildings were added later: A tower on the western side and a weaponhouse to the south. In 1905 a sacristy was added to the northern side of the church. The inside of the church is also whitewashed and the flat ceiling is in plaster with stucco, the choir arch has been changed into a pointed arch. The alterpiece is from 1614 and was ...
Founded: c. 1150 | Location: Haderslev, Denmark

Øsby Church

Øsby Church is a large, white village church, which was remodelled into a Gothic long church. You can see the remains of the original 13th century church at the bottom of the east wall. The current church was built in the 16th century. The church has large, Gothic windows to the south, giving the church a bright and airy space with four sets of rib vaults. The ribs are decorated in Gothic frescoes, and on the northern w ...
Founded: 16th century | Location: Haderslev, Denmark

Bjerning Church

the exact foundation of Bjerning Church is unknown, but since the original part of the church, nave and choir is a typical Romanesque ashlar-church, it is reasonable to assume that is was erected around the year 1200. Fixtures in the church also confirms this, like a figure of an archbishop in wood, which has been dated to around 1250, and a figure of Mary and child from around 1350. On November 17th 1937, a violent fire ...
Founded: c. 1200 | Location: Haderslev, Denmark

Moltrup Church

Moltrup Church is mentioned for the first time in 1460 but it was erected probably in the 12th century. The sacristy was added in 1728. The altarpiece is from the 17th century and pulpit from 1882.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Haderslev, Denmark

Nustrup Church

Nustrup Church consists of a Romanesque nave, choir and apse with late-Gothic tower and an unusually large weaponhouse towards the south. The church is rich in exciting fixtures, like a St. Hjælper (Saint Helper) crucifix from the early 1400s. The altarpiece dates from 1475 and Renaissance pulpit from 1575.
Founded: c. 1100 | Location: Haderslev, Denmark

Sønder Starup Church

Sønder Starup Church is a Romanesque church dating from c. 1100.  The tower was erected around 1450.
Founded: c .1100 | Location: Haderslev, Denmark

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Trinity Sergius Lavra

The Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius is a world famous spiritual centre of the Russian Orthodox Church and a popular site of pilgrimage and tourism. It is the most important working Russian monastery and a residence of the Patriarch. This religious and military complex represents an epitome of the growth of Russian architecture and contains some of that architecture’s finest expressions. It exerted a profound influence on architecture in Russia and other parts of Eastern Europe.

The Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius, was founded in 1337 by the monk Sergius of Radonezh. Sergius achieved great prestige as the spiritual adviser of Dmitri Donskoi, Great Prince of Moscow, who received his blessing to the battle of Kulikov of 1380. The monastery started as a little wooden church on Makovets Hill, and then developed and grew stronger through the ages.

Over the centuries a unique ensemble of more than 50 buildings and constructions of different dates were established. The whole complex was erected according to the architectural concept of the main church, the Trinity Cathedral (1422), where the relics of St. Sergius may be seen.

In 1476 Pskovian masters built a brick belfry east of the cathedral dedicated to the Descent of the Holy Spirit on the Apostles. The church combines unique features of early Muscovite and Pskovian architecture. A remarkable feature of this church is a bell tower under its dome without internal interconnection between the belfry and the cathedral itself.

The Cathedral of the Assumption, echoing the Cathedral of the Assumption in the Moscow Kremlin, was erected between 1559 and 1585. The frescoes of the Assumption Cathedral were painted in 1684. At the north-western corner of the Cathedral, on the site of the western porch, in 1780 a vault containing burials of Tsar Boris Godunov and his family was built.

In the 16th century the monastery was surrounded by 6 meters high and 3,5 meters thick defensive walls, which proved their worth during the 16-month siege by  Polish-Lithuanian invaders during the Time of Trouble. They were later strengthened and expanded.

After the Upheaval of the 17th century a large-scale building programme was launched. At this time new buildings were erected in the north-western part of the monastery, including infirmaries topped with a tented church dedicated to Saints Zosima and Sawatiy of Solovki (1635-1637). Few such churches are still preserved, so this tented church with a unique tiled roof is an important contribution to the Lavra.

In the late 17th century a number of new buildings in Naryshkin (Moscow) Baroque style were added to the monastery.

Following a devastating fire in 1746, when most of the wooden buildings and structures were destroyed, a major reconstruction campaign was launched, during which the appearance of many of the buildings was changed to a more monumental style. At this time one of the tallest Russian belfries (88 meters high) was built.

In the late 18th century, when many church lands were secularized, the chaotic planning of the settlements and suburbs around the monastery was replaced by a regular layout of the streets and quarters. The town of Sergiev Posad was surrounded by traditional ramparts and walls. In the vicinity of the monastery a number of buildings belonging to it were erected: a stable yard, hotels, a hospice, a poorhouse, as well as guest and merchant houses. Major highways leading to the monastery were straightened and marked by establishing entry squares, the overall urban development being oriented towards the centrepiece - the Ensemble of the Trinity Sergius Lavra.

In 1993, the Trinity Lavra was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List.