Haderslev Cathedral

Haderslev, Denmark

Work on building Haderslev Cathedral began in the mid-13th century. It was originally a large cross-shaped single-naved church built of bricks and granite cubes recycled from an older church. Only the original transept is still standing. The church nave was soon expanded to include three tall naves under one roof. This type of church is called a hall church. The present three-naved choir from 1400 is one of the most beautiful choirs from the Gothic period and has three incredibly tall 16-metre windows that allow the light to flood in. When South Jutland was reunified in 1920, the church was elevated to the status of a cathedral in the newly established Haderslev Diocese.

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Details

Founded: c. 1250
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Martin Kjer (3 years ago)
Altid hyggelig at komme her,føler sig altid velkommen
Peter Pommelot (3 years ago)
Bei einem Spaziergang durch die Altstadt unbedingt besichtigen.
Michael Müller (4 years ago)
Altid et besøg værd
Elton Dias (5 years ago)
This is the 1st church in Denmark that became protestant. They have a 3D painting in the church when you enter to the right. There is a regiment that comes once a week to turn the page of the book which is kept in a small room, to the right side of the alter. This church has writings in German and Danish. They also have service in German.
Erik Cheng (5 years ago)
Nice traditional dome
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