Haderslev Cathedral

Haderslev, Denmark

Work on building Haderslev Cathedral began in the mid-13th century. It was originally a large cross-shaped single-naved church built of bricks and granite cubes recycled from an older church. Only the original transept is still standing. The church nave was soon expanded to include three tall naves under one roof. This type of church is called a hall church. The present three-naved choir from 1400 is one of the most beautiful choirs from the Gothic period and has three incredibly tall 16-metre windows that allow the light to flood in. When South Jutland was reunified in 1920, the church was elevated to the status of a cathedral in the newly established Haderslev Diocese.

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Details

Founded: c. 1250
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Monique Hut (2 years ago)
Beautiful, a very impressive cathedral. It is clearly wel cared for and it is great that it is still in use after 700 years
Christian Lindberg (3 years ago)
Absolutely beautiful architecture. I found it odd that there were tipping booths with mobile pay notes several places though?
Sven (5 years ago)
Nice church with good background information about the history
Olaf Chalmer (5 years ago)
A must see. Light and cosy. You cannot have been in Haderslev without hving seen the cathedral!
Martin Kjer (5 years ago)
Altid hyggelig at komme her,føler sig altid velkommen
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