Top Historic Sights in Kolding, Denmark

Explore the historic highlights of Kolding

St. Nicholas Church

Saint Nicholas Church dates from around 1250 and the oldest church in Kolding, but only few parts of the original building are preserved. The present exterior is from 1885-1886, and the interior decorations are mainly from a restoration in 1753-1758. The altarpiece is from 1589-1590 and was paid for by the vassal of Koldinghus, Casper Markdanner (vassal 1585-1617). It is made with inspiration from the Dutch copper engrav ...
Founded: c. 1250 | Location: Kolding, Denmark

Koldinghus Castle

Koldinghus Castle was founded in the 13th century and was expanded since with many functions ranging from fortress, royal residency, ruin, museum, and the location of numerous wartime negotiations. The castle was originally founded by Christoffer I in 1268 but the oldest remaining part of buildings is the north side facing the castle lake originally built by king Christoffer III (1441–1448). The western side was later b ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Kolding, Denmark

Sønder Stenderup Church

Sønder Stenderup Church was probably built between 1150-1200 in Romanesque style and tower around 1500. The altarpiece is Late Gothic and font dates from Romanesque times.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Kolding, Denmark

Hejls Church

Hejls church was built in the Romanesque style in 12th century. The tower was added in the 15th century and all other buildings from 1780 to 1950. 
Founded: 12th century | Location: Kolding, Denmark

Harte Church

Harte Church was built in the 12th century in Romanesque style. The entrance and tower dates from 15-16th centuries. The old altarpiece was given by Abildgaard, the lord of Vranderupgaard. In the cemetery you will find a soldiers grave from the battle at Kolding (1849). In this battle, Harte church served as headquarter and observation post for the army led by general Rye.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Kolding, Denmark

Stepping Church

Stepping Church was built in the early 12th century and the Late Gothic tower was added later. The pulpit dates from 1588.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Kolding, Denmark

Viuf Church

Viuf Church was built first time in the mid-12th century and it has been restored several times. The Romanesque choir and nave were built in Romanesque style and the tower was added in 1730. The church bell dates from 1447 and pulpit from 1600.
Founded: c. 1150 | Location: Kolding, Denmark

Taps Church

Taps Church consists of Romanesque style choir, nave and apse and late medieval tower. The altarpiece is late Gothic.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Kolding, Denmark

Sønder Bjert Church

Sønder Bjert Church was built near the end of the 12th century out of stone cut from boulders and originally did not have a tower. The church"s roofing consists of lead, which was last renovated in 2000. The crucifix was built in the mid-13th century and altarpiece was made by Hans Dreyer in 1624. The baptismal font dates from around 1650. 
Founded: 12th century | Location: Kolding, Denmark

Lejrskov Church

Lejrskov Church was built in the Romanesque style in the 12th century. The porch and tower were added around 1525-1550. The church got its current appearance in 1764 restoration. The font, altarpiece and pulpit date from the 1500s. 
Founded: 12th century | Location: Kolding, Denmark

Skanderup Church

Skanderup Church was built probably around 1200 and is mentioned first time in 1280. The church contains a number of monuments, epitaphs and some magnificent Baroque style oak wood carvings, also produced in the workshop of Peter Jensen Kolding.
Founded: c. 1200 | Location: Kolding, Denmark

Eltang Church

Eltang Church was built around 1100 and enlarged later in the Middle Ages. The church bell dates from 1588.
Founded: c. 1100 | Location: Kolding, Denmark

Bramdrup Church

Bramdrup Church dates probably from the late 12th century or 13th century and was rebuilt in 1880. In the cemetery is a memorial for fallen soldiers of Battle of Kolding (1849).
Founded: 12th century | Location: Kolding, Denmark

Seest Church

Seest Church consists of a Romanesque choir and the ship, originally the apse, and a late medieval tower in the west. A late medieval porch in front southern door was demolished by the mid-1800s. The walls of chancel and nave is of field stone, and space has retained his flat beam ceilings. Arc is a brick wall on the Renaissance, possibly from 1539. During restoration 1963-64, led by architect JK Jepsen, Kolding, was afte ...
Founded: c. 1400 | Location: Kolding, Denmark

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Abbey of Saint-Étienne

The Abbey of Saint-Etienne, also known as Abbaye aux Hommes ('Men"s Abbey'), is a former monastery dedicated to Saint Stephen (Saint Étienne). It is considered, along with the neighbouring Abbaye aux Dames ('Ladies" Abbey'), to be one of the most notable Romanesque buildings in Normandy. Like all the major abbeys in Normandy, it was Benedictine.

Lanfranc, before being an Archbishop of Canterbury, was abbot of Saint-Etienne. Built in Caen stone during the 11th century, the two semi-completed churches stood for many decades in competition. An important feature added to both churches in about 1120 was the ribbed vault, used for the first time in France. The two abbey churches are considered forerunners of the Gothic architecture. The original Romanesque apse was replaced in 1166 by an early Gothic chevet, complete with rosette windows and flying buttresses. Nine towers and spires were added in the 13th century. The interior vaulting shows a similar progression, beginning with early sexpartite vaulting (using circular ribs) in the nave and progressing to quadipartite vaults (using pointed ribs) in the sanctuary.

The two monasteries were finally donated by William the Conqueror and his wife, Matilda of Flanders, as penalty for their marriage against the Pope"s ruling. William was buried here; Matilda was buried in the Abbaye aux Dames. Unfortunately William"s original tombstone of black marble, the same kind as Matilda"s in the Abbaye aux Dames, was destroyed by the Calvinist iconoclasts in the 16th century and his bones scattered.

As a consequence of the Wars of Religion, the high lantern tower in the middle of the church collapsed and was never rebuilt. The Benedictine abbey was suppressed during the French Revolution and the abbey church became a parish church. From 1804 to 1961, the abbey buildings accommodated a prestigious high school, the Lycée Malherbe. During the Normandy Landings in 1944, inhabitants of Caen found refuge in the church; on the rooftop there was a red cross, made with blood on a sheet, to show that it was a hospital (to avoid bombings).