St. Nicholas Church

Kolding, Denmark

Saint Nicholas Church dates from around 1250 and the oldest church in Kolding, but only few parts of the original building are preserved. The present exterior is from 1885-1886, and the interior decorations are mainly from a restoration in 1753-1758.

The altarpiece is from 1589-1590 and was paid for by the vassal of Koldinghus, Casper Markdanner (vassal 1585-1617). It is made with inspiration from the Dutch copper engraver Hendrick Goltzius.The pulpit with the sounding board from 1591 with the escutcheon of Casper Markdanner and the letters “G.M.B”, short for his motto: Gott mein Beistand. The sandstone baptistery with evangelist symbols on the sides was made in 1619-1620. Above the baptistery, you see a carving from 1636.

Several epitaphs and headstones bears witness of the use of the church throughout centuries. At the church’s website, you can read more about the individual families these epitaphs were set for. The painted glass windows in the church choir were created by Professor Kræsten Iversen, who worked on them in the years 1945-1950, where they were consecrated in connection with a great 700th anniversary of Saint Nicolai Church.

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Address

Skolegade 2E, Kolding, Denmark
See all sites in Kolding

Details

Founded: c. 1250
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anette Nielsen (2 years ago)
A lovely church I got married there and a beautiful church
Mogens Balslev (2 years ago)
Huge beautiful church, nice light and lots of space :)
Navdeep Nandrajog (3 years ago)
Cool church. A lot of people on Christmas day. Beautiful place.
Radovan Degro (3 years ago)
beautiful historic town ...
Сергей Захаров (3 years ago)
Church decorates the city.
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