Top Historic Sights in Kongens Lyngby, Denmark

Explore the historic highlights of Kongens Lyngby

Frilandsmuseet

Frilandsmuseet (The Open Air Museum), opened in 1897 and covering 40 hectares, it is one of the largest and oldest open-air museums in the world. It is a department under the Danish National Museum. The museum features more than 100 buildings from rural environments and dating from 1650-1950. All buildings are original and have been moved piece by piece from their original location save a windmill that is still found in i ...
Founded: 1897 | Location: Kongens Lyngby, Denmark

Hermitage Palace

In 1694, Christian V built a two-story timber frame house in the Deer Park north of Copenhagen. In 1734, that building was demolished, and in the period 1734-1736, royal architect Lauritz de Thurah built the existing hunting seat on the hilltop in the middle of the plain. The palace is an distinguished example of de Thurah’s architectural skills and one of the late Baroque’s best works in Denmark. The ground-plan of ...
Founded: 1734-1736 | Location: Kongens Lyngby, Denmark

Sorgenfri Palace

Sorgenfri Palace was built by the architect Francois Dieussart in 1705-06 for Carl Count Ahlefeldt. From 1730, this country house was owned by the royal family, and Crown Prince Frederik (V) had court architect Lauritz de Thurah build a wing for the gentlemen of the Court and a horse stable. When Frederik V became king, the palace was given to his aunt, grand duchess Sophie Caroline of East Friesland, who let de Thurah de ...
Founded: 1756-1757 | Location: Kongens Lyngby, Denmark

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.