In 1694, Christian V built a two-story timber frame house in the Deer Park north of Copenhagen. In 1734, that building was demolished, and in the period 1734-1736, royal architect Lauritz de Thurah built the existing hunting seat on the hilltop in the middle of the plain.

The palace is an distinguished example of de Thurah’s architectural skills and one of the late Baroque’s best works in Denmark. The ground-plan of the palace is symmetrical on all four floors.The kitchen is located centrally in the basement under the dining room. Along the south gable, the beautiful staircase goes through the whole house. The stairwell is covered in tiles with hunting motifs. The tiles were produced at the factory on St. Kongensgade.The bel étage houses the large dining hall, the grandest room with rich decorations in marble, plaster, mirrors and marbled wood. The two southern rooms are in a striking late Baroque style, whilst the three northern rooms, the king’s and queen’s rooms, are in Rococo style. The central room on the top floor is the servants’ sitting room.

In 1736, Johan Jeremias Reusse, a cabinet maker, built a table machine, a mechanical device with table and accessories. This is the famous Hermitage table, which allowed the beautifully laid table to be hoisted through a hatch in the dining room floor so one could dine without servants or, in French, “en hermitage”. A few years later, a new table machine was constructed by order of court architect Nicolai Eigtved. This version had technical problems and needed repairs, and it was entirely removed at the end of the 1700s. The palace has been renovated several times, most recently when the palace underwent a through restoration of its sandstone exterior from 1979 to 1991.The Hermitage Palace has, through the years, been the centre for royal hunts. It is at the disposal of The Queen, who today uses it for official lunches. The palace is closed to the public.

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Details

Founded: 1734-1736
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stephanie Timm (10 months ago)
Beautiful animal gardens. Tons of walking areas and you are able to see so many deer, reindeer and other animals. Also a really neat hunting castle.
Mujahid Mohamed (11 months ago)
Located in the middle of the Dyrhaven, it's a perfect location to go for a long walk
Harald Rokke (12 months ago)
Fabulous place and ambience and great views that merits the visit The only draw down is that the manor it self is closed. Rent a horse and carridge for a romantic and hominid experience
Justin Bunch (12 months ago)
The palace is only open June-August on appointment and you can book your tour online. However from the outside the palace is certainly quaint. It was built to host banquets by Frederick III and was modelled off French designs. It's one of the best preserved Baroque palaces in Denmark.
solai prabhu (16 months ago)
It's a small castle and we can reach very easily by bicycle. Just after the main entrance to deer Park. Take the road to right and almost in 15 minutes (average speed) we can reach to castle. From the castle view of the open green land is amazing, here is where you can see plenty of deer. Good calm area. All will surely love it when we have good weather.
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