Frilandsmuseet (The Open Air Museum), opened in 1897 and covering 40 hectares, it is one of the largest and oldest open-air museums in the world. It is a department under the Danish National Museum. The museum features more than 100 buildings from rural environments and dating from 1650-1950. All buildings are original and have been moved piece by piece from their original location save a windmill that is still found in its original location.

The museum contains rural buildings from all regions of Denmark, including many of the small and remote Danish islands like Bornholm, Læsø. Represented are also buildings from the Faroe Islands, as well as the former Danish possessions of Southern Schleswig in Germany and Scania andHalland in Sweden. The distribution demonstrates how life has been adapted to regional living conditions and availability of materials. Buildings include a farmhouse from the island of læsø thatched with kelp

Represented in the collection are also all social living conditions, from a manor house to a poorhouse, different types of buildings like farms, mills and workshops, and numerous professions. The museum include six mills including a post mill from 1662. Some of the mills are regularly operated by a guild of volunteers.

The grounds of the museum also features 25 historic gardens and cultural landscapes and livestock of old Danish breeds. The gardens and animals are displayed in connection with the socially and geographically corresponding buildings.

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Details

Founded: 1897
Category: Museums in Denmark

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
natmus.dk

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hans-Henrik S. Hansen (7 months ago)
Very interesting look at how the Danes lived in the early years. Also their version of A Christmas Carol was quite entertaining, and the children loved it. Highly recommended
Ninna H. Nielsen (9 months ago)
I love this museum. I go several times a year with work (daycare) and we explore the different houses and talk about how they lived in olden days. It's worth the entrance fee!
LUCBAN Karen (9 months ago)
Great place to explore to see the all old things and nice to walk
Rollin Olson (10 months ago)
Very interesting large area with many reconstructed old farmstead and other buildings. Original (or equivalent) interiors & furnishings from 16th to 20th centuries. Helpful signage in Danish and English to describe the details. 2 windmills , 1 water mill in working condition; when open, knowledgeable guides are pleased to explain their workings. Overall, a fascinating look at life of ordinary people in past centuries.
Balázs Salfay (11 months ago)
Lovely place to visit outside of Copenhagen! Its truly a treasure. You can spend a half day there and don't forget your picnic blanket;)
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