Top Historic Sights in Võru, Estonia

Explore the historic highlights of Võru

St. Catherine's Church

The Lutheran church of St. Catherine was built between 1788-1793. It is named after Empress Catherine II, who donated 28 000 silver roubles to the construction. The classicist-style building is a one naved church with large arched blind windows. In the course of renovation in 1879, the spire received a new helmet and a clock with four faces. Supposedly architect Christoph Haberlandt made the design of the church. The alt ...
Founded: 1788-1793 | Location: Võru, Estonia

Võry Orthodox Church

The late-classicism style church was designed by M. Schons, chief architect of the Livonian Province. The master carpenter was Johann Karl Otto, a resident of Võru. The church was completed in 1804 and named the Greatmartyr Catherine’s Church in honour of Catherine II. The building has a simple rectangular ground planning, a sturdy western spire, a cupola-like ridge roof on the high tambour and arched windows ...
Founded: 1804 | Location: Võru, Estonia

Kirumpää Castle Ruins

The first record of Kirumpää Castle (in German Kirrumpäh) dates back to the year 1322. It was one of the residences of Bishopric of Dorpat. The castle was destroyed in a Swedish-Russian war in 1658. Much of the ruins were used for construction in Võru town in XVIII-XIX century. Today, there is little left of the former castle. The ruins are located on a small scenic hill. Reference: Wikimedia Common ...
Founded: 1322 | Location: Võru, Estonia

Väimela Manor

The Väimela manor originates from the 16th century and belonged to von Richters and von Loewens for a long time. The stylish Classicist manor complex originates from the beginning of the 19th century. Now it belongs to a vocational school. The originally one-storey main building was turned into a two-storey one in the 20th century. A kilometre from the centre of the estate, there is the cemetery chapel of the von Lo ...
Founded: 19th century | Location: Võru, Estonia

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.