St. Catherine's Church

Võru, Estonia

The Lutheran church of St. Catherine was built between 1788-1793. It is named after Empress Catherine II, who donated 28 000 silver roubles to the construction. The classicist-style building is a one naved church with large arched blind windows.

In the course of renovation in 1879, the spire received a new helmet and a clock with four faces. Supposedly architect Christoph Haberlandt made the design of the church. The altarpiece depicts Christ on the cross and is subject to protection by the state as a heritage of culture.

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Address

Jüri 9, Võru, Estonia
See all sites in Võru

Details

Founded: 1788-1793
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kalle Hein (11 months ago)
Kaupo Hõrak (15 months ago)
Tore kodukandi kirik.
Real Vt (19 months ago)
Ilus koht
Janek Nääme (19 months ago)
Anatoly Ko (7 years ago)
Külaoru küla, Vastseliina vald, Võrumaa 57.747252, 27.266532 ‎ 57° 44' 50.11", 27° 15' 59.52 Время постройки: 1772; 1901 Церковь по соседству со средневековым местом паломничества – часовней крепости Вастселийна. На месте прежней, деревянной, возведена барочная церковь с колоритной пристройкой в стиле историцизма (архитектор Р. Польман, 1901). Своеобразный интерьер и оформление алтаря (1922) полотном «Женщины у гроба Господня».
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