Top Historic Sights in Eurajoki, Finland

Explore the historic highlights of Eurajoki

Irjanne Church

The church in Irjanne village is the oldest wooden church in Satakunta county. It was built in 1731 to replace the older medieval church. The bell tower wad erected in 1758. Old cemetery and church park surround the church.
Founded: 1731 | Location: Eurajoki, Finland

Vuojoki Mansion

The manor house of Vuojoki is one of the most beautiful empire mansions in Finland. Vuojoki is mentioned in historical documents in the 16th century. First manor was established in 1626 by Gottfrid von Falkenberg.Vuojoki Mansion did not really flourish until the 1830s, when captain Lars Magnus Björkman (ennobled in 1834 Björkenheim) bought it. Lars Magnus Björkenheim built the current buildings and drafted an ambitious ...
Founded: 1836 | Location: Eurajoki, Finland

Liinmaa Castle

Liinmaa Castle ("Vreghdenborch") was a medieval castle in Eura. In 1367 Albrecht von Mecklenburg, the king of Sweden, ordered to demolish a castle in Kokemäki. It was replaced by two new castles, one in Liinmaa and another in Linnaluoto (Aborch). Liinmaa castle contained two inner ground walls, wooden structures and a moat. The story of Liinmaa castle was very short: it was abandoded in the beginning of the 15th century ...
Founded: ca. 1370 | Location: Eurajoki, Finland

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.