Liinmaa Castle ("Vreghdenborch") was a medieval castle in Eura. In 1367 Albrecht von Mecklenburg, the king of Sweden, ordered to demolish a castle in Kokemäki. It was replaced by two new castles, one in Liinmaa and another in Linnaluoto (Aborch). Liinmaa castle contained two inner ground walls, wooden structures and a moat. The story of Liinmaa castle was very short: it was abandoded in the beginning of the 15th century when administration was moved to Kastelholm and Turku Castles.

By the legend Liinmaa was also a camp of pirates. This may refer to Victual Brothers, a brotherhood hired in 1392 by the Albrecht von Mecklenburg to fight against Denmark.

Nowadays only some earth walls remains the history of Liinmaa castle.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1370
Category: Ruins in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michal Smola (2 years ago)
Hill in the middle of nowhere.
Päivi Kekäläinen (2 years ago)
There was really nothing left
Jonna Tähtivuori (2 years ago)
There has been a castle here sometime in the 14th century but what is left of it is nothing more than some ramparts and basement pits. However, the place is beautiful.
Sanna Hyrsky (2 years ago)
Very nice little walk from patking by seaside, great seens and nice forest and plants. There is small camping fire ring for cooking sausages and even toilet, bring your own paper is good idea. Great spot for family, info at area is valuable in 3 languages.
Madalin Burlacu (4 years ago)
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