Vuojoki Mansion

Eurajoki, Finland

The manor house of Vuojoki is one of the most beautiful empire mansions in Finland. Vuojoki is mentioned in historical documents in the 16th century. First manor was established in 1626 by Gottfrid von Falkenberg.

Vuojoki Mansion did not really flourish until the 1830s, when captain Lars Magnus Björkman (ennobled in 1834 Björkenheim) bought it. Lars Magnus Björkenheim built the current buildings and drafted an ambitious greenhouse and garden plan. "Vuojoki Castle", as people called the Mansion that time, completed in 1836. It used to be the second biggest manor in Finland. The main building, two annexes and the greenhouse, Orangerie, were designed by C.L. Engel.

Vuojoki manor is owned by the municipality since 1934. Today it’s open to the public, a permanent exhibition about history and guided tours are available. The mansion provides also conference and restaurant services.

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Details

Founded: 1836
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

More Information

www.muuka.com
www.vuojoki.fi

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pertti Metsanen (2 years ago)
Joululounaalla pikkaisen meinasi seisovan pöydän ylläpito katkeilla
J J (2 years ago)
Tänään 1.12 mitä parhain opastettu kierros. Kiitos oppaalle.
Mikko Viitala (2 years ago)
Rauhallinen kartanomiljöö jossa hotelli, kokoustilat, tilausravintola ja saunatilat.
TheAliveGhost The Ghoster Famely TGF (2 years ago)
There is cool to be but not alot to do.
Sascha Müller (7 years ago)
Good lunch menu at fair price in a very nice atmosphere.
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