Top Historic Sights in Jyväskylä, Finland

Explore the historic highlights of Jyväskylä

Aviation Museum of Central Finland

The Aviation Museum of Central Finland exhibits the aviation history of Finland, from the early 1900s until today. The exhibition consists of aircraft, engines and aircrew equipment which has been used by the Finnish Air Force. The equipment of the Air Force Signals Museum has its own section. A large collection of scale models gives a wider perspective to the whole field of aviation.
Founded: 1979 | Location: Jyväskylä, Finland

Jyväskylä City Church

Jyväskylä City Church is located in the heart of city. The church building was completed in 1880, five years after the establishment of the city parish. The church was designed by architect L. I. Lindqvist and construction led by the Swedish-born architect, Anders Johan Janzon. The red-brick church replaced the earlier wooden church built in 1775.The new church was needed since the early 1850s due the poor condition and ...
Founded: 1880 | Location: Jyväskylä, Finland

Jyväskylä Old Cemetery

The old cemetery of Jyväskylä parish was founded in 1837. In 1899 the area was extended to the north side of the old part and again in 1924. Several memorials remind of the people who have had a strong influence to culture life of the city and the entire Finland. There are also a cemetery chapel (1931) and the old mortuary (built in 19th century) located in the cemetery area.
Founded: 1837 | Location: Jyväskylä, Finland

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.