Jyväskylä City Church

Jyväskylä, Finland

Jyväskylä City Church is located in the heart of city. The church building was completed in 1880, five years after the establishment of the city parish. The church was designed by architect L. I. Lindqvist and construction led by the Swedish-born architect, Anders Johan Janzon. The red-brick church replaced the earlier wooden church built in 1775.

The new church was needed since the early 1850s due the poor condition and location of old church. When the new church was completed, it was the first stone church in Central Finland. Architecture includes both neo-Roman and neo-Gothic features. The church was originally built near the city square, today it is surrounded by a park. The altarpiece “Jesus blesses the children” was painted by Fredrik and Nina Ahlstedt in 1901.

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Details

Founded: 1880
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

More Information

www3.jkl.fi
en.luovapaja.fi

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marius Kieldsen (10 months ago)
This church is something special. It is a Very pretty church that sits right in the middle of the beautiful town of Jyväskylä. I hope I wrote it correctly. But my dad and I went there in the summer, we came all the way from Denmark, I think it was in the middle of June 2020 and it was very hot that day in Finland. So my dad and I looked around town for a long time for a nice place to chill and cool down from the sun. And in the end we found this very pretty church that sat right in this beautiful place in the town. At this place we could have shadow and enjoy some drink we brought. Sadly we could not go inside the church. Maybe it was closed because of the disease. I will not make this review too long, but I just think, as a religious young man as myself, that this Jyväskylä city church is something special. But anyway I would love to go back here again next summer. Finland is such a nice place. Especially when you drive along the small roads that all lead around Finland. So if you are reading this still, please come visit this church in Jyväskylä. You will not regret it.
Karel Tittl (2 years ago)
Nice place. Especially before Christmas there are the beatifull illuminative decorations.
Ocean Wilde (2 years ago)
For a Lutheran church, this is particularly grandiose - and I mean that in a good way. Church park: or "kirkkopuisto", as locals call it, has become one of the most popular hangout spots in the centre of the city. Unfortunately, this also means it has a habit of getting rowdy with drunks during certain evening hours of the year. They organise regular events and sermons, if one is interested in such a thing. The staff seem kind, tolerant, and respectful of most people.
nirbhay mishra (2 years ago)
Nice area and beautiful area in church garden.
No Problemo (2 years ago)
Very beautiful in winter time
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