Aviation Museum of Central Finland

Jyväskylä, Finland

The Aviation Museum of Central Finland exhibits the aviation history of Finland, from the early 1900s until today. The exhibition consists of aircraft, engines and aircrew equipment which has been used by the Finnish Air Force. The equipment of the Air Force Signals Museum has its own section. A large collection of scale models gives a wider perspective to the whole field of aviation.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Category: Museums in Finland

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robin Bobin (9 months ago)
It was the nice trip from Helsinki to Tikkakoski! Two bombers, Brewster and Me-109 ...
René Schwietzke (9 months ago)
Nice place. The amount of information in English could be larger and directly displayed and not via some extra leaflet. But I still enjoyed the museum.
Peter August (10 months ago)
One of those technical museums in which you look (and feel) at actual exhibits and not huge signs. Made with a lot of attention to detail. Definitely a 10/10.
Maritta Mathias (12 months ago)
Interesting place with many historic and newer aircraft related to the Finnish airforce. Well worth a visit, but without young unruly children please!!
Folkers Johannes Tulkki-Williams (12 months ago)
Very good museum, a definite recommendation for other international visitors.
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